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Rapper Kanye West, in an Oval Office meeting Thursday with President Donald Trump, delivered a rambling speech about his mental health, his family, his business, “the universe” and his fondness for the president.

Sporting a red “Make America Great Again” cap, West said, “They try to scare me into not wearing this hat.”

“This hat gives me power in a way,” he said, later comparing it to a “Superman cape.”

West, who was at the White House for a lunch meeting on criminal justice, gang violence prevention and other topics, gave extended remarks that lasted nearly 10 minutes, in front of rolling cameras and a trove of reporters.

He was seated alongside former NFL star Jim Brown, who was also there to discuss prison reform.

West spoke of his family, noting that “my dad and my mom separated so I did not have a lot of male energy in my home and also I married into a family where, you know, there’s not a lot of male energy. It’s beautiful though.”

He also disclosed that he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but that he felt it was a “misdiagnosis” and that he was simply sleep-deprived.

Over the course of his sprawling speech of loosely connected ideas, West also talked about the Thirteenth Amendment, his business partnership with Adidas, and whether he would ever run for president.

To that, West said, “Let’s stop worrying about the future, all we have is today.” The president, he added, “is on his hero’s journey.”

At other points, however, West touched on issues of race and criminal justice, including policing and other social issues.

He said that controversial “stop-and-frisk” policing used in Chicago “does not help relationships” in the city, and seemed to criticize welfare. He also encouraged schools to implement mental health and art programs for children and said violence on the streets is a product of illegal guns, not legal guns.

Following the statement by West, Trump said, “I tell you what, that was pretty impressive.”

“That was quite something,” Trump said.

West then said, “It was from the soul. I just channeled it.”

West has repeatedly expressed support for Trump during his presidency, drawing backlash as a result. West has said that he didn’t vote in 2016, but if he had, he would have voted for Trump, and he met with Trump during his presidential transition.

Last month, West sported a “Make America Great Again” hat as he delivered an off-air politically themed rant to an uncomfortable audience after the taping of the Sept. 29 season premiere of “Saturday Night Live,” which airs on NBC.

During the speech, West defended Trump and claimed to be his “real” self, boasting that he had not taken what many presumed to be his psychiatric medication.

In May, Trump met with West’s wife, Kim Kardashian West, about criminal sentencing reform. During the meeting, Kardashian West pushed Trump to commute the sentence of Alice Marie Johnson, a first-time offender who was sentenced to life in prison in Tennessee in 1996 for her involvement in a drug conspiracy. The president commuted her sentence in June.

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O’Rourke, other Dems don’t want tent city’s contract renewed

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/ Source: Associated Press

By The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Rep. Beto O’Rourke and four other Democratic members of Congress toured a remote tent city in West Texas on Saturday where they said that 2,700 immigrant teens are being held at a cost of roughly $1 million per day.

The lawmakers urged the nonprofit running the facility not to renew a federal contract that expires Dec. 31, a longshot request that could effectively shutter the camp. It was supposed to be temporary but has instead taken in more children and taken on a permanent feel with soccer fields, a dining facility and tents housing separate sleeping quarters for boys and girls.

U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, the 2018 Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Texas, speaks during a campaign rally, Monday, Nov. 5, 2018, in El Paso, Texas.Eric Gay / AP file

O’Rourke — a Texan who has been mentioned as a potential 2020 presidential candidate after nearly upsetting Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in his deep-red state — was joined by U.S. Sens. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Jeff Merkley of Oregon and Tina Smith of Minnesota, and California Rep. Judy Chu.

O’Rourke said he and his colleagues weren’t allowed to speak to the children in any meaningful way.

“They kind of nodded their heads, but what are they going to say when everyone around them is watching?” O’Rourke said after touring the facility. “But there was something in the look on their faces that we saw, the way that they weren’t really engaged in the sports that they were playing out on those fields.”

“We need to shut it down,” Chu added. “It is inhumane. It is a child prison. It has no right to exist.”

O’Rourke made no mention about his possible White House aspirations after making his fourth visit to the camp just outside Tornillo. He noted the area was about an hour’s drive from his native El Paso, which borders Mexico at the westernmost tip of Texas.

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Where Americans stand apart (and together) on holiday gifts

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 / Updated 

By Dante Chinni and Sally Bronston

WASHINGTON — It’s the holiday season, the time of year where we put aside our differences and celebrate goodwill toward all. But in 2018 America, politics can find its way into unexpected places — even into the gifts under the tree or the boxes you’re wrapping this weekend.

Data from Simmons Consumer Research shows political partisanship even seeps into what toys and gifts we’ll be exchanging this season. The company asked people what toys they are looking to buy this season and some patterns emerged.

If your child got a toy from a Trump voter, there’s a decent chance it is something from Nerf.

If your child got a toy from a Trump voter, there’s a decent chance it is something from Nerf.

Among Trump voters, 36 percent said they expect to shop for Nerf products in the next six months. That’s eight points higher than Clinton voters, 28 percent said they would be shopping for Nerf with the holidays approaching.

Nerf is a lot more than just spongy footballs and basketballs. There are lots of good, safe, Nerf guns out there. That may be driving the partisan difference here. Trump voters, in general, tend to be more supportive of gun rights.

Looking at a gift from that uncle who is a known independent voter? The Simmons data suggests Hot Wheels may in your future.

Looking at a gift from that uncle who is a known independent voter? The Simmons data suggests Hot Wheels may in your future.

More than four in 10 independents told Simmons they were planning on buying something from the universe of miniature die-cast vehicles. The number among Democrats and Republicans is about 10 points lower.

And even in 2018, Barbie lives on as a holiday purchase among Democrats and Republicans alike.

Even in 2018, Barbie lives on as a holiday purchase among Democrats and Republicans alike.

About a quarter of people who are registered with each party said they would be purchasing the fashion/career doll that has endured for nearly 60 years. No word on whether they purchased her as a beekeeper, an astronaut, or a farmer — a few of Barbie’s many professions.

But beyond those toys, there is one children’s gift everyone seems to agree upon: Legos.

There is one children’s gift everyone seems to agree upon: Legos.

Majorities of men and women, liberals and conservative and, yes, even Clinton and Trump voters said they were planning on buying the building brick toy as the holidays approached.

For the older kids, including those above the age of 18, video games are often the gift of choice and the data suggest a couple of points on them.

First and foremost if you are buying a gift for an adult, video games are more popular among Democrats. They are more likely to say they have played games on a list of popular titles. But leaving that fact aside, there are some partisan breakdowns in the world of screens and controllers.

The most popular games for both Democrats and Republicans are Call of Duty, and Fortnite.

The most popular games for both Democrats and Republicans are “Call of Duty” and “Fortnite.” Further down the list, Democrats favor Super Mario Kart, while Republicans lean towards MLB, the popular baseball game.

And in this time of year that is always special for children, the data from Simmons reveal one final nugget that is bigger than just toys or games; it is about parenting.

Majorities of Republicans and Democrats say they want to provide their children with things they didn’t have as a child.

Majorities of Republicans and Democrats say they want to provide their children with things they didn’t have as a child. And majorities of Republicans and Democrats admit that they often indulge their children with “little extras.” Or, as Simmons Chief Scientist Steve Millman says, “When it comes to spoiling the kids, we’re all just Americans!”

That’s likely one big note of political agreement when getting together with friends and relatives this year during the holidays. And that’s a good thing to have this season because if this week’s news is any indication, discord is likely to reign in next year’s political discussions.

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Trump’s ‘temper tantrum’ over wall funding is leading to shutdown

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By Ben Kamisar

WASHINGTON — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer Sunday said President Donald Trump is preventing a deal to avert a partial government shutdown because of a “temper tantrum” over his demand for more funding to build a border wall.

Appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press” just five days before funding deadline to keep several key federal agencies open, Schumer, D-N.Y., said that he and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are standing firm in their offers to Trump and that it’s up to the president to come to the table.

“We Democrats, Leader Pelosi and I, offered the president two options as to how to avoid the shutdown,” he said.

“We should not let a temper tantrum, threats, push us in the direction of doing something even our Republicans colleagues know is wrong.”

Shutdown gamesmanship has defined the final weeks of the lame-duck congressional session, as both sides struggle to reach a spending agreement.

The key sticking point has been over funding for the border wall, the signature promise Trump made on the campaign trail.

The president wants at least $5 billion for construction on the wall, a steep price tag that Democrats have called a non-starter. They’ve proposed $1.6 billion for what they deem “border security,” arguing that the money won’t go toward a wall and that Republicans are responsible for finding a solution since the party has control of Congress (even though any agreement would need some bipartisan support in the Senate).

That divide brought Schumer and Pelosi to the White House last week for an unprecedented and tense exchange with Trump that played out on television.

Complicating the dynamic is Trump’s willingness to accept responsibility for the shutdown. During that Oval Office meeting with Schumer and Pelosi, Trump said he would be “proud to shut down the government for border security.”

It’s an argument that may resonate with those in his base who see the wall as an important symbol of a tougher approach to border security, but it was also a comment Democrats think will shield them from responsibility in a shutdown.

Schumer argued that there are not enough votes for the full $5 billion authorization in either the House or Senate, a point that Republicans have contested. Accusing the president of putting government funding at risk to “throw a bone to his base,” Schumer said that it’s up to Republicans to get Trump to the table.

“They just have to have the guts to tell President Trump he’s off on the deep end here and all he is going to get with his temper tantrum is a shutdown. He will not get a wall,” Schumer said.

During his interview, Schumer also addressed another major point of disagreement in Congress — the path forward on health care.

He blasted a Friday decision in federal court that ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional as an “awful ruling” and promised that Democrats will fight “tooth and nail” to ensure that the law is protected.

Also appearing on “Meet the Press,” Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt, a member of GOP leadership, criticized the Affordable Care Act as a “poorly thought-out” plan that’s had “negative” impacts on families. But cautioned that the ruling has “no immediate impact” until the case can be appealed.

And while admitting that there’s far from a consensus in Congress around a health care plan, even amongst Republicans, he said that there’s universal concern on the right about a Democratic push toward single-payer health.

“The one thing I think we would be able to unite on is Medicare-for-all would wind up meaning Medicare for none,” he said.

“There is no way that will happen and there’s no way voters will let that happen.”



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