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Chinese cryptocurrency start-up Bottos wants to end the monopoly tech giants like Amazon and Facebook have on data, its founder and chief executive said Wednesday.

“We’re trying to break the data monopoly situation currently,” Xin Song told CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal at the East Tech West conference held in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.

Xin’s company makes an artificial intelligence (AI)-focused blockchain platform, which provides digital marketplaces of data and models to help train AI programs and connect them with users, as well as networks for computing power and data storage.

The firm’s boss explained that AI models can issue crypto tokens using the Bottos platform in exchange for data from entities using its data marketplace.

“Currently, almost all the big data are controlled by the industry giants, and for the small-to-medium companies it’s very difficult for them to get the data,” he said.

“But with blockchain technology… people can provide those data, and with the traceability and the transparency of the data usage in the future, people in the world and people in the blockchain community (will be) willing to contribute their individual data.”

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Historic rally may set investors up for pain

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Money manager Douglas Gordon is worried about a potentially widespread problem in long-term investors’ portfolios.

Gordon, who’s instrumental in building Russell Investments’ asset allocation strategies, believes many investors haven’t rebalanced their portfolios to reflect the historic 2019 stock market rally.

According to Gordon, the market rally’s robust gains are tilting investors too far into stocks.

The bottom line: If there’s another pullback, it’ll leave them wide open to losses that may have been avoidable.

“It’s a good time to re-assess where you’re at with respect to being diversified in a multi-asset solution,” the firm’s senior portfolio manager said Friday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

Since the Christmas Eve plunge, the S&P 500 has soared 18 percent. Because of the market’s sharp rebound, Gordon suspects a 3 to 5 percent sell-off could strike stocks in the coming weeks.

For protection, Gordon recommends taking some profits from the historic rally. Plus, he’d consider going overseas, a strategy he’s employing right now as part of a balanced allocation strategy.

“I’d probably right now prefer to take my higher beta exposures maybe in EM [emerging markets],” said Gordon, who’s responsible for $48.5 billion of the firm’s assets.

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Airports create sleeping spaces for travelers on the go

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Business travelers once looked to airline club rooms as calm oases that offer quiet areas to relax, work, conduct important phone calls or, perhaps, catch a nap.

These days, it’s not unusual for airline-operated and independent lounges to be as crowded and noisy. Congested airport terminals and gates have areas that many frequent travelers are willing to pay a fee to avoid – and there are alternatives on offer.

Outside the United States, travelers seeking alone time might check into one of the Napcabs equipped with beds, worktables, touch screens, WiFi and baggage storage, located inside Germany’s Munich or Berlin-Tegel Airports.

Elsewhere, Yotel offers cozy, cabin-like hotel rooms equipped with creature comforts such as futon-like beds, wifi, and flat screen TVs, located inside airport terminals in Amsterdam, London and Paris. Coming soon: Istanbul and Singapore.

Domestically, travelers seeking sleep, a place to work or a quiet place to have a phone conversation have an increasing range of options.

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Sam Jadallah to join Apple as its new leader on smart home devices

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Sam Jadallah, the former CEO of a smart lock company that shut down just over a year ago, has a new job: He’ll be leading the home initiatives at Apple, sources familiar with the matter told CNBC.

Hiring Jadallah is the latest signal that Apple plans to get serious about its own efforts in the home. Recently, the company acquired a start-up called Pullstring, a start-up that specializes in voice-enabled toys. That purchase could help the smartphone maker become the center of a connected living room.

Apple has a range of products geared to the home — including HomeKit, its software service that connects with a broad array of third-party products; and HomePod, a smart speaker for the home with voice recognition, music and more.

Both Apple and Jadallah declined to comment to CNBC on the hire.

Jadallah previously ran a start-up called Otto, which made a $700 lock that was backed by the venture firm Greylock. He also spent more than a decade at Microsoft, and had a stint in venture capital at the firm Mohr Davidow.

Otto suspended its operations four months after launching its beautifully-designed Bluetooth- and Wi-Fi-enabled luxury lock. In interviews, Jadallah hinted at having found a buyer, which pulled out at the last minute.

About 70 percent of the early team behind Otto were actually poached from Apple’s ranks, Jadallah has previously said. The lock was compared favorably by reviewers to the “Apple of smart locks.” It’s not clear whether Jadallah will bring these early employees with him, or will have a fresh mandate to hire. There are currently about half-a-dozen job openings in Apple’s home division.

But Apple also competes against rivals like Alphabet and Amazon, both of which have had a head start on moving into the home. All three companies have a combination of hardware and software that controls everything from turning lights on and off using voice, to playing music. Apple’s HomePod represents a small share of the market, compared to Amazon’s Echo and Google Home.

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