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By Suzanne Gamboa and Gwen Aviles

Democrats poised to hold committee positions in Congress that will give them jurisdiction over agencies in charge of keeping immigrants in custody, especially children, said Thursday they plan to step up scrutiny of immigration detention next year.

Democrats won control of the House in November’s elections, which means the party’s House members shift into chairmanships of committees and subcommittees in the next Congress that starts in January.

“There’s a lot of work to be done,” said Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, a California Democrat who is likely to chair the House Appropriations Committee’s subcommittee on Homeland Security. Roybal-Allard is now the subcommittee’s ranking member, the spot reserved for the most senior member of the minority party.

On her list of things to get done are providing better access to legal counsel, using alternatives to detention particularly for families, ensuring that immigration facilities are more regularly inspected and more funding for the hiring of social workers to work with unaccompanied child migrants, she said.

“Mainly it’s going to be oversight, pushing for fairness and justice for these immigrants,” Roybal-Allard said.

Although illegal immigration has dropped significantly in recent years, the Trump administration has stepped up immigration detention, including holding parents and children from Central America who have been more likely to cross the border and surrender to law enforcement authorities and request asylum.

Rep. Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut is likely to become the chair of the House Appropriations subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education. She is the ranking Democrat on that subcommittee right now. She pledged to “get accountability for the taxpayers’ dollars” being spent to hold immigrant children in tents in Tornillo, Texas.

She criticized a White House request for another $190 million for the unaccompanied children program to be added to the spending bill that Congress is negotiating, which she said would prolong the detention of immigrant children that is already averaging about 70 days.

“I will do everything I can to prevent them from getting one more nickel,” DeLauro said.

Congress is trying to finish up the spending package this year and there is debate over how much will be spent on immigration enforcement, including immigration detention and the border President Donald Trump’s had promised to build at Mexico’s expense.



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Brexit vote delay: Will Brexit deal vote go ahead? Or will Theresa May CANCEL Brexit vote?

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PARLIAMENT was due to vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal on Tuesday but sources close to the government are now suggesting the vote will not go ahead as planned. Will Brexit deal vote go ahead? Or will Theresa May CANCEL Brexit vote?

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U.S. appeals court won’t immediately allow Trump asylum ban

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By Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — A divided U.S. appeals court late Friday refused to immediately allow the Trump administration to enforce a ban on asylum for any immigrants who illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

The ban is inconsistent with an existing U.S. law and an attempted end-run around Congress, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a 2-1 decision.

“Just as we may not, as we are often reminded, ‘legislate from the bench,’ neither may the Executive legislate from the Oval Office,” 9th Circuit Judge Jay Bybee, a nominee of Republican President George W. Bush, wrote for the majority.

A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Justice, Steven Stafford, did not have comment. But he referred to an earlier statement that called the asylum system broken and said the department looked forward to “continuing to defend the Executive Branch’s legitimate and well-reasoned exercise of its authority to address the crisis at our southern border.”

At issue is President Donald Trump’s Nov. 9 proclamation that barred anyone who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border between official ports of entry from seeking asylum. Trump issued the proclamation in response to caravans of migrants approaching the border.

A lower court judge temporarily blocked the ban and later refused to immediately reinstate it. The administration appealed to the 9th Circuit for an immediate stay of Judge Jon Tigar’s Nov. 19 temporary restraining order.

In a dissenting opinion Friday, 9th Circuit Judge Edward Leavy said the administration “adopted legal methods to cope with the current problems rampant at the southern border.” Nothing in the law the majority cited prevented a rule categorically barring eligibility for asylum on the basis of how a person entered the country, Leavy, a nominee of Republican President Ronald Reagan, said.

In his Nov, 19 ruling, Tigar sided with legal groups who argued that federal law is clear that immigrants in the U.S. can request asylum regardless of whether they entered legally.

The president “may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden,” the judge said in his order.

The ruling led to an unusual public dispute between Trump and Chief Justice John Roberts after Trump dismissed Tigar — an appointee of Trump’s predecessor — as an “Obama judge.”

Roberts responded with a statement that the federal judiciary doesn’t have “Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges.”



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Brexit SHOCK warning: May's battle over EU exit could TEAR APART Tories for GOOD

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THE Brexit battle could leave the Conservative Party split in two as MPs turn their back on Theresa May amid the blazing row over Britain’s exit from the EU, senior Tories have admitted.

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