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The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s query about whether Trump knew.

Meng’s arrest has infuriated Chinese officials, who have demanded her release, even as the Justice Department seeks her extradition to the United States.

The case also has further roiled an already strained trade relationship between the U.S. and China. The countries last week struck a 90-day truce in their trade squabble.

A person familiar with the matter told Reuters that Meng’s arrest is related to violations of U.S. sanctions. Iran is currently the subject of U.S. sanctions. Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., said that Meng’s arrest was “for breaking U.S. sanctions against Iran.”

Read more: Why the U.S. government is so suspicious of Huawei

A court hearing on possible bail for Meng is scheduled for Friday.

Huawei said in a statement to The Globe and Mail newspaper in Canada that Meng faces “unspecified charges” in the Eastern District of New York, and that she was arrested when she was transferring flights.

“The company has been provided with very little information regarding the charges and is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng,” the statement said. “The company believes the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will ultimately reach a just conclusion.”

Huawei also said the company “complies with all applicable laws and regulations where it operates, including applicable export control and sanction laws.”

On Thursday, Sen. Mark R. Warner, D-Va., the vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and committee member Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said they have urged Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “to reconsider Huawei’s inclusion in any aspect of Canada’s 5G development, introduction, and maintenance.”

In a joint press release, the senators said, “The entry of Chinese state-directed telecommunications companies like Huawei into the Canadian market could seriously jeopardize the relationship between U.S. and Canadian carriers, depriving North American operators of the scale needed to rapidly build out 5G networks.”

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BJP headed for setbacks amid farmer unrest

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An Indian woman casts her vote at a local polling station for state elections in the village of Raisar in Rajasthan on Dec 7, 2018.

Vishal Bhatnagar / NurPhoto / Getty Images

An Indian woman casts her vote at a local polling station for state elections in the village of Raisar in Rajasthan on Dec 7, 2018.

Farmer discontent and weak job growth could hurt the performance of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in state elections. That offers a crucial opportunity for the main opposition party, the Indian National Congress, to shine.

Five states recently went to the polls to elect representatives to their respective assemblies. Votes will be counted on Tuesday, with special attention on the regions of Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Rajasthan. The three Hindi-speaking areas boast a combined state domestic product of roughly $305 billion and are among the country’s easiest places to do business, according to the World Bank.

Analysts anticipate the outcome in the three states could serve as a preview for the country’s general election in 2019.

“The results of these elections, while not conclusive, may serve as bellwethers for whether the nearly 65 parliamentary seats from the electorally important states of Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Chhattisgarh will ultimately go to the opposition Indian National Congress party or to the BJP in 2019,” said Kartikeya Singh, deputy director of the Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India policy studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in a note.

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Canada puts on ‘show trial’ for arrested Huawei CFO

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Canada treated her “as a dangerous criminal” and “violent offender” by restraining her with handcuffs and forcing her to wear ankle restraints following her initial bail hearing, the paper said.

“It is hard to escape the conclusion that her treatment is something of a show trial intended to humiliate her and China,” it said.

China is regularly accused of violating the human rights of its own citizens who speak out against the government, advocate democracy or question the justice system.

The government has recently drawn widespread international condemnation for detentions of what the United Nations said may be up to one million members of mostly Muslim ethnic groups including Uighurs, who predominantly live in the resource-rich far western region of Xinjiang.

China insists it respects the “rule of law” and has called the mass incarcerations part of a “vocational education and training program” aimed at preventing terrorism.

Huawei Technologies, the world’s biggest telecoms equipment provider, has faced suspicions in the United States and other countries over security concerns related to its equipment. Though Huawei is not a state-owned company, its founder Ren, who once served in the People’s Liberation Army, is seen as having close ties with the government.

Huawei has consistently rejected such concerns, saying there is no proof its network equipment poses a threat.

The China Daily accused the U.S. of aiming to thwart Huawei’s technology ambitions.

Huawei “has been looking to position itself at the forefront of the nascent 5G revolution that is beginning to take shape and the U.S. administration wants to reserve that spot for U.S. companies,” the editorial said.

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Facebook ramps up ad transparency ahead of India’s 2019 elections

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Narendra Modi, India's prime minister, left, speaks as Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook, listens during a town hall meeting at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, U.S., on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015.

David Paul Morris |Bloomberg | Getty Images

Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, left, speaks as Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook, listens during a town hall meeting at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, U.S., on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015.

Advertisers in India who want to run political ads on Facebook will need to confirm their identity and location to prevent abuse of the system ahead of the 2019 general elections, the social networking site said.

As the world’s largest democracy heads to polls next year for its general elections, Facebook announced Thursday that the new transparency measures were aimed at defending any possible foreign interference in the polls.

Advertisers seeking to run ads related to Indian politics will have to use their devices to submit proof of identity and location. This confirmation process might take a few weeks, the social media firm said.

“It’s important that people know more about the ads they see — especially those that reference political figures, political parties, elections, and legislation. That’s why we’re making big changes to the way we manage these ads on Facebook and Instagram,” Facebook said. “By authorizing advertisers and bringing more transparency to ads, we can better defend against foreign interference in India’s elections.”

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