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Jamie Dimon, the chairman and CEO of J. P. Morgan Chase, said Thursday the current market volatility can be attributed to a variety of worries about political risk and oil prices, but the issue “that’s probably roiling the market the most is trade.”

“How bad is it going to get?” Dimon asked during an interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick. Dimon said traders, executives and other market watchers are trying to figure that out and are factoring it into their outlooks.

The U.S. economy is strong, Dimon said. Companies are hiring, consumers are spending, unemployment is down, he noted. But stocks have been volatile. On Thursday, they fell sharply and then tried to recover some of that ground in the afternoon. As of 2:25 p.m. ET, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 454 points.

The U.S. under the Trump administration has engaged in an escalating trade war with China, though the two sides are talking and set a 90 day time frame from Dec. 1 to get an agreement.

Dimon called it a trade “skirmish.” But it is forcing business leaders to find new supply lines, rethink investments or hold off on investments. “Those things are just causing uncertainty, which causes volatility.”

Dimon was in Washington along with the top executives of other large companies to attend the Business Roundtable’s CEO Innovation Summit. The head of the biggest U.S. bank was just elected chairman of the lobbying group for third year as executives face a the second half of President Donald Trump’s term.

Trump’s early policies, including tax cuts last year, have been seen as business friendly but there are challenges, such as the possibility of slowing economic growth and the effects of Trump’s tariffs on American companies.

Dimon says he doesn’t expect the U.S. and China to come to final terms on their trade negotiations in three months, but they should be able to make progress. He places the likelihood of an agreement at 60 percent but says there’s always a risk that something goes south. “That kind of uncertainty is just not good for markets.”

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Apple lays off over 200 from Project Titan autonomous vehicle group

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In August 2018, Apple enlisted a Tesla engineering vice president and Apple veteran, Doug Field, to lead the Titan team alongside Bob Mansfield. This week’s dismissals from the group were seen, internally, as anticipated restructuring under the relatively new leadership.

Other employees who were impacted by the restructuring of Project Titan are staying at Apple, but moving to different parts of the company.

Of late, Apple CEO Tim Cook has touted his company’s initiatives in health as the key to its future growth. “I believe, if you zoom out into the future, and you look back, and you ask the question, “What was Apple’s greatest contribution to mankind?” it will be about health,” Cook told CNBC’s Jim Cramer.

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shares jump despite disappointing earnings

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Company Vice President Sean Kim said the memory demand slowdown would be bigger than expected into the first half of 2019 due to China’s economic slowdown and the U.S.-China “trade situation,” according to Reuters.

Kim’s comments came days after China announced that the country’s economic growth in 2018 was its slowest in nearly three decades. At the same time, Beijing and Washington are attempting to strike a deal amid an ongoing trade dispute which has seen the two largest economies in the world slap billions of dollars worth of tariffs on each other’s goods.

Some analysts were not surprised by the earnings report from SK Hynix.

“(The) results were as expected,” Daniel Yoo, head of global strategy at Kiwoom Securities, told CNBC in an email.

However, he warn that both SK Hynix and its rival Samsung were likely to see their operating profit for the first two quarters of 2019 coming in “less than half of last year’s record high(s).”

Yoo’s sentiments were echoed by Sanjeev Rana, a senior analyst at CLSA.

“I think we have a little bit more pain to go for the next two quarters,” Rana told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday.

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Huawei CFO extradition could be complicated: ex-US ambassador to China

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“Whenever a chief executive starts to voice his or her thoughts on the case, that’s a huge additional complication for the prosecution,” Baucus added. “In this case, it’s President Trump’s statement with respect to the Meng case … it makes it harder for the prosecution to get the extradition.”

Earlier this week, Canadian newspaper Global and Mail reported that the U.S. has told Canada it will formally request for Meng’s extradition — though no timeline was specified.

For its part, China has demanded the U.S. drop the extradition request. According to Canada, Beijing detained more than a dozen of its citizens after Meng’s arrest.

Baucus warned that if the U.S. extradition request is granted, it would have a major impact on the U.S.-China relationship.

The world’s two largest economies had been embroiled in a trade war in recent months, which roiled markets and sparked concerns over the health of the global economy. Late last year, Beijing and Washington agreed to a temporary pause on applying new tariffs in order to work out a mutually agreeable trade deal.

Huawei is one of China’s largest companies. The U.S. government has for years taken issue with the tech giant over its alleged espionage ties to the Chinese government and has accused the company of intellectual property theft.

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.

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