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By Benjy Sarlin

WASHINGTON — Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., announced Wednesday she would vote against her own party’s rules for the incoming Congress over restrictions on deficit spending, pushing long-simmering Democratic divisions into public view.

At issue is House leadership’s plan to include “PAYGO,” a rule Democrats have adopted in the past that requires them to offset any increase in the deficit by cutting spending or raising revenue elsewhere.

“PAYGO isn’t only bad economics…it’s also a dark political maneuver designed to hamstring progress on healthcare + other leg.,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted on Wednesday. “We shouldn’t hinder ourselves from the start.”

She joined Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., who came out against the rules package earlier while warning PAYGO “unilaterally disarms the incoming Democratic majority’s ability to govern.”

The rule is not ironclad and has been waived in the past. Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi’s spokesman Drew Hammill noted on Twitter that Congress is already governed by a stricter version of PAYGO that President Barack Obama signed into law in 2010. That legislation forces cuts to programs unless Congress overrides it, which they’ve done under President Donald Trump.

But the issue has also emerged as a stand-in for a larger divide between the party’s progressive wing and more centrist Democrats over the role fiscal responsibility should play in their agenda.

Likely 2020 contenders are currently proposing tens of trillions of dollars in new spending on health care, education, climate change and other progressive priorities. Given that Republicans passed a $1.9 trillion tax cut and boosted spending under Trump, some in the party argue Democrats shouldn’t let deficit concerns get in the way when they retake power. There’s also growing interest among activists in economic theories that put less stock in fears of a rising debt.

“It reinforces the notion that if you vote for Democrats, the first thing they’re going to do is prioritize budget outcomes over human ones,” Stephanie Kelton, a former adviser to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who has criticized the PAYGO rule told NBC News.

While many in the party have rallied around pricier proposals under Trump, the midterms also featured a slew of Democrats who ran successful campaigns in swing seats attacking Republicans for spilling too much red ink. Their priorities could come into tension as Democrats take on more power.

“Such new House Democrats are likely to find it much harder to vote for major policy advances that progressives strongly support if those measures would add significantly to deficits and debt,” Robert Greenstein, president of the progressive Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, wrote in a piece defending the PAYGO rules.

Activism against PAYGO has been driven by the party’s left flank, but Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, who led a largely centrist coalition against Pelosi’s speakership, also announced his opposition Wednesday.

“Critical investments in education, infrastructure, and health care should not be held hostage to budgetary constraints that Republicans have never respected anyhow,” he said in a statement. “We all believe we need to ultimately bring our budget into balance, but these investments are too important right now to pass up and will yield significant returns for the U.S. Treasury.”

His spokesman Michael Zetts told NBC News told NBC News he is undecided on the overall rules package.

Pelosi earned a key endorsement ahead of the rules vote, however, from Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chairs Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and Mark, Pocan, D-Wisc. In a joint statement, they said they had been “concerned about PAYGO for months,” but were satisfied with commitments from House Democratic leaders not to let it get in the way of progressive legislation.

“With the assurances that PAYGO can be waived, we do plan to vote for the House rules package and proceed with legislation to fix the statute,” they said.



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Britain post-Brexit REVEALED: How Brexit saga will end – Britain WILL leave EU this year

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ALMOST three years after British citizens voted to leave the EU, it is still unclear how, when or if Brexit will take place. How will the Brexit saga end?

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EU facing post-Brexit CRISIS: Donald Tusk fears 'there is NO BRIGHT FUTURE after Brexit'

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EUROPEAN Council president Donald Tusk hopes Britain will retract Article 50 and remain in the EU because he fears a competitive and unhappy relationship with the UK after Brexit, senior aides have claimed.

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Trump snubs John McCain during bill signing intended to honor him

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By Jonathan Allen

WASHINGTON — Congress wanted to honor the ailing Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. President Donald Trump did not.

In extended remarks during a visit to Fort Drum in upstate New York to sign the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 — this year’s version of an annual bill that sets defense policy — Trump chose not to mention the former prisoner of war and Senate Armed Services Committee chairman who is battling brain cancer. He even omitted McCain’s name when citing the title of the bill.

The two men have long been fierce critics of each other, with McCain calling Trump’s supporters “crazies” in 2015 and Trump retaliating by questioning whether McCain, who was subjected to torture in a Vietnamese prison camp, is really a “war hero” because “he was captured.”

The snub at Fort Drum, home to the combat aviation brigade of the Army’s 10th Mountain Division, did not escape the notice of McCain’s allies.

“For those asking did I expect Trump to be an a—— today. No more than I expected it to be Monday,” Mark Salter, McCain’s longtime aide, wrote on Twitter.

McCain’s condition — dire enough that a recent HBO documentary on him was titled “John McCain: For Whom the Bell Tolls” — has not stopped Trump from deriding the Arizona senator at political rallies. Though Trump does not use his name, he tells crowds that he would have been able to repeal Obamacare if not for a thumbs-down sign from one senator — McCain.

The senator’s own statement included Trump’s name in the headline and in a preamble written by staff. But the words attributed to McCain did not.

“I’m very proud that the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 has been signed into law,” he said.

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