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Chinese President Xi Jinping told U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday that history showed cooperation was the best way forward for both the United States and China.

In a congratulatory message to Trump, marking 40 years since the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two countries, Xi said China-U.S. relations have experienced ups and downs but have made historic progress over the past four decades, according to state news agency Xinhua.

Xi’s comments came on the back of Trump’s tweet that a “long and very good call ” had taken place between the two.

Both Trump and Xi agreed to a 90-day pause in tariff escalation in December 2018. The two countries have made plans for face-to-face consultations over trade in January, China’s Commerce Ministry said recently.

The ongoing Sino-U.S. trade war dominated headlines for much of 2018 as they rattled global stocks, with both Chinese and U.S. markets seeing their worst annual performances in a decade.

Xi is also set to deliver a major speech in Beijing on Wednesday about China’s relations with Taiwan, a highly sensitive issue dominating Chinese politics, according to local media.

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Sheryl Sandberg admits to Facebook stumbles

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg acknowledged on Sunday that the embattled social media giant “understands the deep responsibilities we have,” as it strives to earn back users’ trust following months of controversies over user privacy protection and data sharing.

“At Facebook, these last few years have been difficult,” she said, speaking at the DLD conference in Munich. “We need to stop abuse more quickly and we need to do better to protect people’s data. We have acknowledged our mistakes.”

The public backlash really erupted last year when Facebook was accused of misusing its users’ personal information, amid after reports found political consultant agency Cambridge Analytica tapped millions of Facebook users without their explicit consent.

Following the reports in March, the FTC launched an investigation into the company’s data practices. Now, the FTC is reportedly considering a imposing a “record-setting fine” against the social media company.

On Sunday, Sandberg outlined five things Facebook is doing as it “reflects and learns.” Those steps include: Investing in safety and security; protecting against election interference; cracking down on fake accounts and fake information; making sure people feel like they control their own information; and increasing transparency at Facebook, she said.

Regarding election interference, Sandberg said Facebook continues to remove pages on its platform that have “inauthentic behavior” and that the company will be using tactics like this in the upcoming elections to the European Parliament. She said Facebook is blocking more than 1 million “fake accounts” every day. And she said Facebook has “dramatically cut down on the information apps can access” from users.

“Speaking for Mark [Zuckerberg], for myself and for everyone at Facebook, we are more determined than ever to keep people safe. And we are taking strong actions to do it,” she said, referring to the company’s founder and CEO.

Just last month, Facebook released the findings of a civil rights audit led by Laura Murphy, a former director of the ACLU Legislative Office. In those findings, Murphy highlighted particular areas of concern on the social media platform, including voter suppression, advertising targeting and diversity among Facebook’s own employees.

CNBC also reported earlier this month, after speaking with more than a dozen former Facebook employees, how the social media company’s leadership and its performance review system has created a culture where any dissent is discouraged.

“We have to [take action] because so many people use technology for good,” Sandberg said on Sunday, adding that Facebook is one of the largest job creation platforms in the world.

Facebook shares have fallen about 16 percent over the past 12 months.

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Trump presidency at two years: Here’s where things stand

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Trump frequently takes credit for the country’s economic growth, but some are benefiting more than others and there are signs of slowing.

Unemployment has hit historical lows, falling from 4.7 percent percent in January 2017 to 3.9 percent last December. Wages, however, have been slow to catch up.

While the S&P 500 has risen roughly 16 percent since Trump took office, the path upwards has been rocky. Stocks are still recovering from the recent sell-off that saw the market post its worst year in a decade in 2018.

The Federal Reserve has raised interest rates 7 times during the Trump administration, which the president has openly condemned. “The only problem our economy has is the Fed,” he tweeted in December. Still, the Fed expects two more rate hikes in 2019.

White House officials have warned that the prolonged government shutdown could damage economic growth as unpaid workers dampens consumer confidence and government spending.

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Rheinmetall plans to sue Germany over Saudi arms embargo

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German weapons maker Rheinmetall plans to sue the government over its decision to stop all arms exports to Saudi Arabia after the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Spiegel Online reported on Sunday.

Citing a letter to the Economy Ministry, Spiegel said Rheinmetall intends to sue the German government for loss of revenue if the export suspension continues.

Berlin suspended approval of future export licences to Saudi Arabia in October and in November said it had worked with industry to halt shipments of arms sales that were already approved.

No specific timetable was given at the time, but industry sources told Reuters an agreement had been struck to revisit the matter by mid-January.

Last week the economy ministry said the government still had no intention of approving arms exports to Saudi Arabia.

Without citing sources, Spiegel said Rheinmetall believes it can claim for compensation because the government’s decision affected exports that had already been approved.

The company’s management fears shareholders could sue Rheinmetall if the company does not demand compensation for the losses, Spiegel added.

“We cannot comment on individual decisions, possible revocations or individual measures,” the Economy Ministry said in an emailed statement.

A spokesman for Rheinmetall declined to comment on the report.

Spiegel said goods worth up to 2 billion euros (£1.8 billion) are affected by the export suspension, including four Cobra radar systems built by a consortium that includes France’s Thales, Airbus and Lockheed Martin of the United States.

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