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Walk inside Paris’ Station F — dubbed the world’s largest start-up campus — and you might notice how far the concept goes beyond start-ups: Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft are all among the global companies that have set up inside.

That’s all part of its fabric and mission to connect corporates, organizations and universities to more than 1,000 start-ups working there.

CNBC recently visited the campus, which opened in 2017 and for which start-ups must apply through a variety of incubators and programs. And it’s not just a home for tech, either: The campus also includes the likes of L’Oreal, LVMH and BNP Paribas.

“They love being able to talk to people that have encountered the same difficulties, that have resources, that have contacts, so they’re really sharing with each other and I think that’s the main resource that you find here,” Roxanne Varza, the program director for Station F, said of the start-ups and entrepreneurs there.

Station F was backed by French telecom billionaire Xavier Niel, who poured $285 million into the project and was launched around the same time French President Emmanuel Macron took office. Macron has vowed to make France a “startup nation.”

At Station F, Benjamin Joffe, a partner at hardware accelerator HAX which is part of venture capital firm SOSV, praised France’s recent improvements in its available talent, government support and access to early-stage capital.

“France now has a lot of the elements necessary to actually create new companies,” he said.

But, while the aim of Station F is to put France on the international start-up map, Joffe also still sees potential barriers.

“What’s still missing in the ecosystem are things around skills for growth, maybe marketing skills as well, knowledge of international markets and the last thing that’s also missing, I think, in the environment, is the habits and knowledge around exits,” he added. “A lot of start-ups are being created, but really the proof comes when you have an exit.”

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Apple lays off over 200 from Project Titan autonomous vehicle group

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In August 2018, Apple enlisted a Tesla engineering vice president and Apple veteran, Doug Field, to lead the Titan team alongside Bob Mansfield. This week’s dismissals from the group were seen, internally, as anticipated restructuring under the relatively new leadership.

Other employees who were impacted by the restructuring of Project Titan are staying at Apple, but moving to different parts of the company.

Of late, Apple CEO Tim Cook has touted his company’s initiatives in health as the key to its future growth. “I believe, if you zoom out into the future, and you look back, and you ask the question, “What was Apple’s greatest contribution to mankind?” it will be about health,” Cook told CNBC’s Jim Cramer.

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shares jump despite disappointing earnings

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Company Vice President Sean Kim said the memory demand slowdown would be bigger than expected into the first half of 2019 due to China’s economic slowdown and the U.S.-China “trade situation,” according to Reuters.

Kim’s comments came days after China announced that the country’s economic growth in 2018 was its slowest in nearly three decades. At the same time, Beijing and Washington are attempting to strike a deal amid an ongoing trade dispute which has seen the two largest economies in the world slap billions of dollars worth of tariffs on each other’s goods.

Some analysts were not surprised by the earnings report from SK Hynix.

“(The) results were as expected,” Daniel Yoo, head of global strategy at Kiwoom Securities, told CNBC in an email.

However, he warn that both SK Hynix and its rival Samsung were likely to see their operating profit for the first two quarters of 2019 coming in “less than half of last year’s record high(s).”

Yoo’s sentiments were echoed by Sanjeev Rana, a senior analyst at CLSA.

“I think we have a little bit more pain to go for the next two quarters,” Rana told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday.

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Huawei CFO extradition could be complicated: ex-US ambassador to China

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“Whenever a chief executive starts to voice his or her thoughts on the case, that’s a huge additional complication for the prosecution,” Baucus added. “In this case, it’s President Trump’s statement with respect to the Meng case … it makes it harder for the prosecution to get the extradition.”

Earlier this week, Canadian newspaper Global and Mail reported that the U.S. has told Canada it will formally request for Meng’s extradition — though no timeline was specified.

For its part, China has demanded the U.S. drop the extradition request. According to Canada, Beijing detained more than a dozen of its citizens after Meng’s arrest.

Baucus warned that if the U.S. extradition request is granted, it would have a major impact on the U.S.-China relationship.

The world’s two largest economies had been embroiled in a trade war in recent months, which roiled markets and sparked concerns over the health of the global economy. Late last year, Beijing and Washington agreed to a temporary pause on applying new tariffs in order to work out a mutually agreeable trade deal.

Huawei is one of China’s largest companies. The U.S. government has for years taken issue with the tech giant over its alleged espionage ties to the Chinese government and has accused the company of intellectual property theft.

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.

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