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India’s antitrust commission is looking into accusations that Alphabet Inc’s unit Google abuses its popular Android mobile operating system to block its rivals, four sources with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

The Competition Commission of India (CCI) has for the past six months been reviewing a case similar to one Google faced in Europe that led to a fine of 4.34 billion euro ($5 billion) by antitrust regulators last year, three of the sources said. Google has challenged that order.

The European Commission found Google had abused its market dominance since 2011 with practices such as forcing manufacturers to pre-install Google Search and its Chrome browser, together with its Google Play app store on Android devices.

“It is on the lines of the EU case, but at a preliminary stage,” said one of the sources, who is aware of the CCI investigation.

Google declined to comment. The CCI did not respond to Reuters’ queries.

The watchdog’s enquiry into allegations against Google over its Android platform has not previously been reported.

Google executives have in recent months met Indian antitrust officials at least once to discuss the complaint, which was filed by a group of individuals, one of the sources said.

The Indian watchdog could ask its investigations unit to further investigate the accusations against Google, or throw out the complaint if it lacks merit. The watchdog’s investigations have historically taken years to complete.

Android, used by device makers for free, features on about 85 percent of the world’s smartphones. In India, about 98 percent of the smartphones sold in 2018 used the platform, Counterpoint Research estimates.

In October, Google said it would charge smartphone makers a fee for using its popular Google Play app store and also allow them to use rival versions of Android to comply with the EU order.

The change, however, covered only the European Economic Area, which comprises the 28 EU countries and Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

“The CCI will have a tough time not initiating a formal investigation into Google given the EU case, unless they can show the problem has been addressed (by remedies),” one of the sources said.

The Indian complaint presents the latest regulatory headache for the Mountain View, California-based company in a key growth market.

Last year, the Indian antitrust watchdog imposed a fine of 1.36 billion rupees ($19 million) on Google for “search bias” and abuse of its dominant position. It also found Google had put its commercial flight search function in a prominent position on the search results page.

Google appealed against that order, saying the ruling could cause it “irreparable” harm and reputational loss, Reuters reported.

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The money advice every millennial needs to hear

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Experts share their answers to your biggest money questions.

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Sri Lanka market pressures seem contained but action needed: IMF

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The IMF last month agreed to extend its $1.5 billion loan program for Sri Lanka for an extra year into 2020, a move that had bolstered the island’s status as a top-performing frontier debt market this year. The IMF said its board in mid-May would take a final vote on the extension and fifth review of the loan program, which was launched in 2016.

The extra year would provide Sri Lankan authorities additional time to “anchor macroeconomic stability and complete their reform agenda,” Goretti said, adding that the IMF was “deeply saddened by the horrific attacks in Sri Lanka” and “joins the international community in condemning these atrocious acts of terrorism.”

She said Sri Lanka has made important progress in reforming its economy including by revamping its tax system, strengthening social safety net programs and transitioning to central bank inflation targeting.

“The 2019 budget approved in early April strikes a good balance between advancing revenue-based fiscal consolidation, which is important to shore up market confidence given Sri Lanka’s high debt and refinancing needs, while making space for macro critical capital and social spending and business friendly tax measures,” she said.

The statement did not identify specific actions that Sri Lankan authorities should take on security and restoring confidence in the tourism sector.

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US to send delegation to China April 30

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The U.S. flag flies at a welcoming ceremony between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017.

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The U.S. flag flies at a welcoming ceremony between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump in 2017.

The U.S. will send a trade delegation to Beijing next week as trade negotiations continue.

The United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin will be heading to Beijing for talks that will begin on April 30, the U.S. Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. They will meet with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He.

Here is the statement released by the U.S. press secretary:

At President Donald J. Trump’s direction, United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin will travel to Beijing for continued negotiations on the trade relationship between the United States and China. The talks will begin on April 30, 2019. Vice Premier Liu He will lead the talks for China. The Vice Premier will then lead a Chinese delegation to Washington for additional discussions starting on May 8, 2019.

The subjects of next week’s discussions will cover trade issues including intellectual property, forced technology transfer, non-tariff barriers, agriculture, services, purchases, and enforcement.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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