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The former boxer who could be America’s most prolific serial killer has drawn more than a dozen sketches of women he says murdered.

Samuel Little, now 78, has confessed to 90 murders, mostly of black women, from across the US and spanning 40 years.

He is currently serving life for the murders of three women – and he has confessed to killing dozens more across America between 1970 to 2005. He is expected to die in prison in Texas.

According to the FBI, Little “remembers his victims and the killings in great detail” but is “less reliable, however, when it comes to remembering dates”.

Some of the victims. Pic: FBI
Image:
Little says he claimed the lives of 90 people. Pic: FBI

Police are now working to verify the victims from his new confession, releasing an updated map marking the location of his attacks. Eight cases were removed after being confirmed or matched to open cases.

In the Wednesday update to the information published by the FBI in November, one formerly unmatched confession has been matched to a Jane Doe (a term for an unidentified victim).

Although the exact time of when Little drew the pictures isn’t known, the FBI said they were based on his memories of some of his victims.

An FBI statement says Little targeted “marginalised and vulnerable women who were often involved in prostitution and addicted to drugs.”

An updated FBI map showing the locations where Little killed his victims, according to his confessions
Image:
An updated FBI map showing the locations where Little killed his victims, according to his confessions

Agents hope the information will spark the memory of members of the public and generate tips to help solve the dozens of unsolved murders.

Ector County district attorney Bobby Bland in Odessa, Texas, said 50 cold homicide cases have been closed as a result.

Most of the unsolved murder remaining are in California.

Little could be worst serial killer in US history, although only a handful of his confessions have so far been matched to victims by police.

Currently, the deadliest known US serial killer is believed to be Gary Ridgway, otherwise known as “Green River Killer”, who was convicted of 49 murders and is serving a life sentence in Washington state.

:: Samuel Little’s confessions, as set out by the FBI

Phoenix, Arizona

:: Unmatched Confession: Hispanic female in her 40s. Killed in 1988 or 1996. Victim possibly from Phoenix.

:: Unmatched Confession: White female killed in 1997. Victim possibly called “Ann.”

North Little Rock, Arkansas

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1992 or 1993.

Pine Bluff, Arkansas

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed between 1990 and 1997.

West Memphis, Arkansas

:: Confession Matched to a Jane Doe: Black female between 28-29 years old killed in 1984. Victim picked up in Memphis, Tennessee.

A confirmed victim: a Jane Doe who was a black female aged between 28-29 and killed in 1984. Pic: FBI
Image:
A confirmed victim: a Jane Doe who was a black female aged between 28-29 and killed in 1984. Pic: FBI

San Bernardino, California

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between the ages of 18-23 killed in 1984.

Los Angeles, California

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1987.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1987.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 19, killed in 1987.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 50, killed in 1987. Victim possibly called “Granny.”

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 22-23 years old killed in 1987.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 26-27 years old killed in 1987.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 40-45 years old killed in 1990 or 1991. Victim possibly called “Alice.”

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 20-22 years old killed in 1991 or 1992. Victim possibly from San Francisco.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1992.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1992 or 1993.

:: Unmatched Confession: Hispanic female between 24-25 years old killed in 1992 or 1993. Victim possibly from Phoenix.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 23-25 years old killed in 1996.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 23-24 years old killed in 1996. Victim possibly called “T-Money.”

:: Unmatched Confession: White female between 23-25 years old killed in 1996.

An unmatched confession of a while woman aged between 23-25 years old, killed in 1996. Pic: FBI
Image:
An unmatched confession of a while woman aged between 23-25 years old, killed in 1996. Pic: FBI

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female age 25 killed in 1996.

Homestead, Florida

:: Unmatched Confession: White female killed in 1970 or 1971.

Miami, Florida

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 22, killed in 1971.Victim possibly called “Linda.”

:: Unmatched Confession: Black male, age 18, killed in 1971 or 1972. Victim possibly called “Mary Ann” or “Marianne.”

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 28, killed in 1971 or 1972. Victim possibly worked on Homestead Air Force Base.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 23-24 years old killed in the mid 1970s. Victim possibly called “Emily.” Victim possibly worked at the University of Miami.

Kendall, Florida

:: Unmatched Confession: White female age 45 killed in 1973. Victim possibly called “Sarah.” Victim possibly from Massachusetts.

Fort Myers, Florida

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1984.
Tampa Bay, Florida

::Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1984.

Plant City, Florida

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1977 or 1978. Met victim in Clearwater, Florida.

Savannah, Georgia

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 22-23 years old killed in 1974.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female age 23 killed in 1984.

Atlanta, Georgia

An unmatched confession of a black woman aged between 35-40 years old, killed in 1981. Pic: FBI
Image:
An unmatched confession of a black woman aged between 35-40 years old, killed in 1981. Pic: FBI

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 35-40 years old killed in 1981.

:: Unmatched Confession: White female, age 26, killed in 1983 or 1984. Victim possibly from Griffith, Georgia.

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 23-25 years old killed in 1984. Victim possibly a college student.

Macon, Georgia

:: Confession Matched to a Jane Doe: Black female between 30-40 years old killed in 1977.

Dade County, Georgia

:: Confession Matched to a Jane Doe: Black female between 25-30 years old killed in 1980 or 1981. Met the victim in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Granite City, Illinois

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 26, killed between 1976 and 1979. Met victim in St. Louis, Missouri. Victim possibly called “Jo.”

An unmatched confession of a victim, possible called Jo, a black female, age 26, killed between 1976 and 1979. Pic: FBI
Image:
An unmatched confession of a victim, possible called Jo, a black female, age 26, killed between 1976 and 1979. Pic: FBI

East St. Louis, Illinois

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed between 1976 and 1979. Met victim in St. Louis, Missouri.

Covington, Kentucky

:: Unmatched Confession: White female killed in 1984. Met victim in Columbus, Ohio. Body disposed of somewhere in Northern Kentucky (city unspecified).

New Orleans, Louisiana

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1973. Victim possibly called “Sarah.” Victim possibly worked at a restaurant in New Orleans.

:: Unmatched Confession: White female killed in 1982.

Monroe, Louisiana

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 24, killed between 1987 and the early 1990s.

An unmatched confession of a black woman, aged 24, killed between 1987 and the early 1990s. Pic: FBI
Image:
An unmatched confession of a black woman, aged 24, killed between 1987 and the early 1990s. Pic: FBI

Prince George’s County, Maryland

:: Confession Matched to a Jane Doe: White female between 20-25 years old killed in 1972. Victim possibly from Massachusetts.

Gulfport, Mississippi

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 22, killed between 1980 and 1984.

Pascagoula, Mississippi

:: Confession Matched to a Jane Doe: Black female between 35-45 years old killed in 1977. Met the victim in Gulfport, Mississippi. Victim possibly from Pascagoula. Victim possibly worked at Ingalls Shipyard.

A drawing matched to a 'Jane Doe', a black woman aged between 35-45 years old killed in 1977. Pic: FBI
Image:
A drawing matched to a ‘Jane Doe’, a black woman aged between 35-45 years old killed in 1977. Pic: FBI

Las Vegas, Nevada

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 40, killed in 1993.

Cincinnati, Ohio

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1974.

Charleston, South Carolina

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 28, killed between 1977 and 1982.

Knoxville, Tennessee

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female, age 25, killed in 1975.

Wichita Falls, Texas

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female killed in 1976 or 1977. Body disposed of somewhere outside of Wichita Falls (city unspecified).

Houston, Texas

:: Unmatched Confession: Black female between 25-28 years old killed between 1976 and 1979 or in 1993.

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US demands Syria ceasefire as it announces sanctions against Turkey | World News

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President Trump has told the Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan to end the incursion into Syria, as the US announced sanctions against Turkey.

Vice President Mike Pence said Mr trump spoke directly to president Erdogan demanding an immediate ceasefire and talks with Kurdish forces.

“President Trump communicated to him very clearly that the United States of American wants Turkey to stop the invasion, implement an immediate ceasefire and to begin to negotiate with Kurdish forces in Syria to bring an end to the violence,” Mr Pence said.

He, along with national security adviser Robert O’Brien, is being sent to Ankara as soon as possible to try to negotiate an end to the fighting.

Mike Pence is being sent to Turkey to try to negotiate a ceasefire
Image:
Mike Pence is being sent to Turkey to try to negotiate a ceasefire

Turkey’s incursion into northern Syria has raised international alarm – and came after Mr Trump’s surprise move last week to pull a group of US forces, who had fought alongside Kurdish militia against IS, from a section of the border.

The US withdrawal freed Turkey to begin operations against the Kurds in Syria – action which it considers a matter of survival, and insists it will not tolerate the virtual self-rule that the Kurds succeeded in carving out in northern Syria.

Ankara wants to create a corridor – a so-called “safe zone” – clearing out the Kurdish forces.

Tens of thousands of people have already fled the latest fighting
Image:
Tens of thousands of people have already fled the latest fighting

The latest conflict has sparked yet another humanitarian crisis in the region with tens of thousands of people fleeing the fighting.

The US has strenuously denied that the US pull out amounted to a green light for the Turkish incursion.

A senior US official said on Monday: “This was not caused by any action of President Trump…Nothing we did was going to deter the Turks from what they wanted to do. President Erdoğan was going to act regardless.”

Faced with the Turkish onslaught, Syrian Kurdish forces previously allied with the US said they had reached a deal with President Bashar Assad’s government to help them fend off Turkey’s invasion.

Syrian government troops have already moved into towns and villages in northeastern Syria.

President Assad’s return to the region his troops abandoned in 2012 is a turning point in Syria’s eight-year civil war, giving yet another major boost to his government and its Russian backers and is like to endanger, if not altogether crush, the brief experiment in self-rule set up by Syria’s Kurds since the conflict began.

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Bloodshed, betrayal and a huge battlefield: 24 hours in northeastern Syria | World News

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I cannot remember a sequence of events, bloodshed and geopolitical machinations in a single day that involved so many countries and so many people. In a single day.

We were on the road again, had been for four days, but as each hour passed, our ability to move safely in Kurdish northeast Syria lessened.

We overtook cars, trucks, flatbeds, and pick-ups laden with belongings, but there were fewer and fewer. Almost anyone who could, had already left the border lands between Syria and Turkey.

On the side of a road, near a truck stop, we came across five lorries, they were full of families. They had grouped together and were living there.

They were so confused by the fighting and the ever-changing shape of this battle that they decided to be mobile so they could move in any direction at any time.

Image:
Children of young families take shelter under a lorry

The families had left the battle for Aleppo six years ago to find safety. The war has caught them up. They are fleeing once again.

This day on the road and the subsequent 24 hours became one of the most remarkable of my entire career.

The fighting between the Turkish backed militia and the Kurds intensified along a huge battlefield – basically the border between Turkey and Syria.

Claims and counter claims of success and failure filled the airways as the battle raged on. In truth nobody knew what was going on. We constantly had to stop to assess our routes.

News emerged that in the chaos of fighting, hundreds of Islamic State families and fighters had escaped from a camp and prison.

Image:
Many families have decided to be mobile so they could move in any direction at any time

We had been in the de facto capital of Kurdish Syria, Qamishli, when an Islamic State car bomb destroyed a restaurant this week; now we were told in frenzied messages by Kurdish intelligence that IS sleeper cells had been activated and that our hotel was a target.

It brought panic to the staff and the guests, many of whom, like us, were Western journalists.

Our local producers rushed upstairs and said that we needed to stay away from the hotel front windows and pack and get out as soon as possible.

We peered into the street and could see armed intelligence officers surrounding the building, closing down the road and inspecting all cars coming and going.

We packed and left for a safe house.

Image:
Some of the little girls who are camping in schools

It was eerie outside. The streets were quiet. The Turkish invasion and the news of the IS breakout and the threat of suicide bombers on the loose had spooked and depressed everyone.

On this day the Turkish invasion had intensified, nearly a thousand IS families and fighters had escaped, the capital was under attack and then from nowhere news of another even more shocking atrocity – a Turkish strike on a civilian convoy heading to act as human shields in the border town of Ras al Ain.

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Our local guys watched in horror on social media as the videos flashed around. The pictures were horrendous.

We have good contacts with aid agencies as well and soon they were sending us their own videos of the hospitals and clinics where the injured were being treated.

We wanted to file this story and all the others from the day so far, but were stuck in a courtyard waiting to be told we could move to yet another safe place.

We sat with our friends and talked. In those moments, as they spoke in Kurdish, smoked heavily and occasionally hugged each other, it dawned on me as it had with them that the Kurdish grip on the homeland they call Rojava was slipping away.

Image:
Many families have decided to be mobile so they could move in any direction at any time

As night fell we moved to our new accommodation deep in a Kurdish only district of the city. They said it would be safe forever, until this bombshell: the Kurds had done a deal with the regime of Bashar al Assad and the Russians.

Abandoned by the USA, the UK and France, the Kurds had no choice. The Kurds have always done deals with some pretty dubious regimes to maintain their autonomy or even their existence for generations, but this latest move meant our safe area was soon to come under the control of Damascus once again.

“It is bad or very bad, those are the options,” our Kurdish cameraman said.

He sounds matter-of-fact. He had tears in his eyes.

Image:
Children living on the side of the road

As the night skies filled with tracer rounds and as the sounds of gunfire echoed around the Arabic parts of the city in celebration that the regime was returning, our friends sat with their heads in their hands and wept. We all did.

How quick the regime would start to take back control of the region we did not know.

Local officials said we were fine but I was dubious. Syria considers us illegal entrants to the country and would accuse us of consorting with terrorists. The sentence is 12 years in prison.

Image:
Celebratory gunfire in the sky in Qamishli

I have been wanted by the regime since 2012 and I’m on a blacklist. Given their previous form for murdering people, I was in no doubt Bashar’s people would kill me if they caught me.

We woke early after a few hours’ sleep. Everything seemed fine. Nothing much appeared to have changed. Rather than rush we had coffee and talked to our foreign desk about some live appearances on our morning show and where we could film.

Then messages came through.

The border would be taken back by the regime in four hours. We were three hours away.

We scrabbled downstairs with our kit – 20 plus pieces. We sped off towards the border with Iraq. Iraq a safe haven? You couldn’t make it up.

We made the final crossing from Rojava. We left our friends behind and waved as our bus moved away and past rows of people trying to leave as well. As foreigners we were given priority. There is no discussion. It’s the system.

As we crossed the pontoon bridge to safety I thought of the children I had seen within this 24 hours; displaced from home and camping in schools where they will be taught Arabic, not Kurdish from now on.

Rojava was a dream but it has gone.

For sure though, the children will learn one thing in Kurdish: the meaning of betrayal.

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Charleston to Tokyo: Conde Nast Traveller’s top 20 cities to visit | Travel News

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The port city of Charleston in America’s Deep South has topped a list of the best cities in the world.

Conde Nast Traveller magazine’s readers voted for their favourite cities to travel to in 2019 based on architecture, nightlife, accommodation and food.

Places in America and Japan featured the most in the list, with three each, while European cities also did well.

UK cities were notably absent, while African and South American cities also didn’t make the list.

Here are the top 20 cities to visit in the world:

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