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By Dartunorro Clark, Allan Smith and Hallie Jackson

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he is “extremely unhappy” with the bipartisan deal lawmakers reached to avert a government shutdown this week that provides money for a southern border fence, but he vowed to build a border wall anyway.

“I am extremely unhappy with what the Democrats have given us,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “It’s sad. They’re doing the country no favors. They’re hurting our country very badly. But we certainly don’t want to see a shutdown.”

Trump added that he is considering all options to fund his proposed border wall. A White House official told NBC News earlier Tuesday that even if Trump signs off on the agreement reached Monday night to keep the government open, other options were on the table to build a more substantial barrier.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, tweeted Tuesday that Trump “should take executive action” to secure the border.

Trump also said Tuesday that he didn’t think there would be another government shutdown this Friday, which would come on the heels of the longest federal shutdown in U.S. history. But “if you did have it, it’s the Democrats’ fault,” he said.

“And I accepted the first one, and I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished because people learned during that shutdown all about the problems coming in from the southern border,” Trump added. “I accept it — I’ve always accepted it. But this one, I would never accept it if it happens, but I don’t think it’s going to happen. But this would be totally on the Democrats.”

The deal that Democrats in Congress agreed to, however, includes billions for Department of Homeland Security priorities like new technology and more customs officers as well as the border barrier.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters Tuesday afternoon that he thinks the compromise is “a good step in the right direction” and that the measure would get support from Republican lawmakers.

“From a Republican point of view, there is money in there for new barrier fencing, and there is no cap on interior enforcement,” McConnell said. “It’s not everything the president hoped to get, but I think it’s a good step in the right direction. I hope he’ll decide to sign it. We’re all quite interested in that, as you can imagine.”

On the possibility that Trump could redirect federal money through executive action, McConnell said, “I think he ought to feel free to use whatever tools he can legally use to enhance his effort to secure the border.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Tuesday on the Senate floor that the government spending agreement was “a path forward for our country,” adding, “I strongly urge President Trump to sign this agreement.”

Trump tweeted Tuesday evening that he had been presented with the deal and doubled down on his promise to build the wall anyway, praising Republicans for putting up with the “Radical Left” during border negotiations.

“Looking over all aspects knowing that this will be hooked up with lots of money from other sources….,” the president tweeted. “Will be getting almost $23 BILLION for Border Security. Regardless of Wall money, it is being built as we speak!”

The government is set to run out of money again on Friday after having been partially shut down for 35 days. That shutdown occurred because lawmakers did not provide Trump with his demand for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall. But Trump eventually relented and signed a short-term funding package that expires in days.

Over the weekend, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said the administration would secure the border, one way or another.

“We’ll take as much money as you can give us,” he said on “Fox News Sunday,” referring to Congress, “and then we will go off and find the money someplace else legally in order to secure that southern barrier.”

Mulvaney added Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that regardless of what money lawmakers provide, Trump will “do whatever he legally can to secure that border.”

On Monday night, a bipartisan group of congressional negotiators announced they had reached an “agreement in principle” to avert another shutdown and further fund border security, though it would not include money for a concrete wall.

The agreement would provide nearly $1.4 billion for new border fencing, which could include steel slats and other “existing technologies,” and an additional $1.7 billion for other Homeland Security priorities like new technology and more customs personnel, multiple sources told NBC News. The deal funds about 55 miles of new border barrier, and Democrats dropped a demand to cap the number of beds for undocumented immigrants detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, told MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on Tuesday that the bipartisan group “put together a deal that we think is fair, that represents our values and will do the job.”

McConnell called the agreement “good news” on the Senate floor Tuesday morning.

“I look forward to reviewing the full text as soon as possible, and hope the Senate can act on this legislation in short order,” McConnell said.

But some of Trump’s allies were apoplectic about the agreement.

“$1.3 billion? That’s not … even a wall, a barrier,” Fox News host Sean Hannity said on his program Monday, asking how any Republican could support “this garbage compromise.”

Conservative pundit Ann Coulter criticized Trump on Twitter for what she claimed was his unwillingness to fight for a wall.

“Trump talks a good game on the border wall, but it’s increasingly clear he’s afraid to fight for it,” Coulter wrote Tuesday. “Call this his ‘Yellow New Deal.'”

Marianna Sotomayor, Rebecca Shabad and Frank Thorp V contributed.



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Jeremy Corbyn facing 10 resignations – could Labour leader be OUSTED over Brexit BETRAYAL?

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JEREMY Corbyn could be facing up to 10 resignations if he does not back a fresh referendum on Theresa May’s Brexit deal. Could Corbyn be forced to stand down over Brexit?

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Trump snubs John McCain during bill signing intended to honor him

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By Jonathan Allen

WASHINGTON — Congress wanted to honor the ailing Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. President Donald Trump did not.

In extended remarks during a visit to Fort Drum in upstate New York to sign the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 — this year’s version of an annual bill that sets defense policy — Trump chose not to mention the former prisoner of war and Senate Armed Services Committee chairman who is battling brain cancer. He even omitted McCain’s name when citing the title of the bill.

The two men have long been fierce critics of each other, with McCain calling Trump’s supporters “crazies” in 2015 and Trump retaliating by questioning whether McCain, who was subjected to torture in a Vietnamese prison camp, is really a “war hero” because “he was captured.”

The snub at Fort Drum, home to the combat aviation brigade of the Army’s 10th Mountain Division, did not escape the notice of McCain’s allies.

“For those asking did I expect Trump to be an a—— today. No more than I expected it to be Monday,” Mark Salter, McCain’s longtime aide, wrote on Twitter.

McCain’s condition — dire enough that a recent HBO documentary on him was titled “John McCain: For Whom the Bell Tolls” — has not stopped Trump from deriding the Arizona senator at political rallies. Though Trump does not use his name, he tells crowds that he would have been able to repeal Obamacare if not for a thumbs-down sign from one senator — McCain.

The senator’s own statement included Trump’s name in the headline and in a preamble written by staff. But the words attributed to McCain did not.

“I’m very proud that the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 has been signed into law,” he said.

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McConnell plans vote on Green New Deal, putting 2020 Dems on the spot

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By Benjy Sarlin

WASHINGTON — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Tuesday he plans to hold a vote on the Green New Deal — an apparent effort to put Democrats, including several presidential contenders, on record supporting an environmental plan that Republicans say is a politically damaging overreach.

“I’ve noted with great interest, the Green New Deal,” McConnell told reporters. “And we’re going to be voting on that in the Senate, going to give everyone an opportunity to go on record, and see how they feel about the Green New Deal.”

The Green New Deal, backed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., is nonbinding, meaning it would not have the force of law even it passed and were signed by the president.

The 14-page document released Thursday sets a goal of moving to net-zero carbon emissions by 2030 and outlines a series of broad methods to achieve it, like upgrading or replacing existing buildings to be more energy efficient, upgrading electric grids to make better use of renewable energy, and investing in electric vehicles and mass transportation. It also includes a call to guarantee a well-paying job for every American and provide universal health care and housing.

A number of current or potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidates signed onto the resolution, including Sens. Kamala Harris of California, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Republicans from President Donald Trump on down have denounced the plan, although much of the criticism has focused on a separate fact sheet that was posted and subsequently retracted by Ocasio-Cortez’s office and that the rest of the resolution’s sponsors did not sign onto.

That document contained language not in the resolution, such as a call for “economic security” for those “unable or unwilling to work,” a plan for “high-speed rail at a scale where air travel stops becoming necessary,” opposition to nuclear energy, and a joke about the difficulty of regulating cow flatulence (which is a real environmental concern). Ocasio-Cortez’s chief of staff tweeted on Saturday that the post was an “early draft” that was released prematurely and “doesn’t represent the GND resolution” that was agreed to with other lawmakers.

The confusion created headaches for Democratic messaging, but it also makes it harder to pin down Democrats on the plan, since its actual text offers few specifics and gives them a wide berth to describe how they’d achieve its goals.



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