Connect with us

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

SUBSCRIBE

By Chuck Todd, Mark Murray and Carrie Dann

WASHINGTON — Culture debates have united Republicans over the last two decades — more than policy, the economy, and certainly trade and tariffs.

And they’ve been punished when they go too far on culture (see Clinton’s impeachment, Terri Schiavo and those transvaginal ultrasound bills in Virginia).

That’s maybe the best way to view the news out of Alabama, whose state Senate last night approved legislation essentially banning abortion at every stage.

Additionally, states like Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi and Ohio have passed laws effectively banning abortion after six weeks of pregnancy — when a fetal heartbeat can be detected — ensuring that abortion will be a significant topic in 2020.

With the NRA hobbled right now, abortion has become even more important to Republicans in fighting the culture wars. Just listen President Trump in his campaign rallies.

But as the polling suggests, the country doesn’t like it when either party becomes too aggressive on abortion.

And that’s the danger for Republicans — whether it’s the legislation out of Alabama or Georgia.

Electability, yeah you know me

“Electability” means so many different things to different people — it’s difficult to gauge or define.

Still, it’s striking that none of the Top 5 2020 Democrats in the polls right now — Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg — has any past record of being able to win or even compete in a purple/red state in a general election.

Biden’s from Delaware and hasn’t been on the ballot by himself since 2008.

Sanders is a democratic socialist from Vermont.

Warren hails from Massachusetts — a graveyard of past failed Dem nominees (Dukakis, Kerry).

Harris is from California.

And Buttigieg lost his lone statewide race in Indiana by 25 points.

By contrast, outside of the Top 5 in polling are Amy Klobuchar (who won 60 percent of the vote in Minnesota last fall), new entrant Steve Bullock (who’s won statewide for governor twice in Montana), Beto O’Rourke (who narrowly lost in Texas in ’18) and Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper (who’ve won multiple statewide bids in Colorado).

Sure, folks like Biden and Sanders can point to early general-election polls to say they’re “electable.” And sure, Donald Trump — a former Democrat from New York City — proved that almost anyone has a puncher’s chance to win if they become the nominee.

But it’s notable — before the first debates, mind you — that Dem voters aren’t rewarding those who have actual records of being able to win or compete in purple/red states.

Is it simply because these voters aren’t aware of these records? Or that progressive Dems don’t find cross-partisan appeal all that compelling? Or that Biden — carrying the Obama banner — has become the standard-bearer for Dem voters who do care about cross-partisan appeal?

It’s going to be McCready vs. Bishop in NC-9 race

Well, we have our general election matchup in the NC-9 congressional race – the 2018 election that got rejected after fraud allegations.

GOP state Sen. Dan Bishop won the GOP primary on Tuesday night, and he will face Democrat Dan McCready on Sept. 10, the Charlotte Observer writes.

Speaking of culture wars: “As he had throughout the campaign, Bishop decried the ‘liberal crazy clowns’ in Washington. He described their agenda as ‘socialism, open borders (and) infanticide,’” the paper adds.

“In a statement, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee signaled its own attacks against Bishop: As the architect of House Bill 2, the so-called ‘bathroom bill,’ and the heir to what it called Republican election fraud.”

2020 Vision: Gillibrand heads to Georgia

This morning, Kirsten Gillibrand’s campaign announced that she will travel to Atlanta on Thursday to meet with women, patients and health-care providers in wake of that state passing an effective six-week abortion ban.

On the campaign trail today: Jay Inslee tours flooding damage in Iowa… And Kamala Harris holds a town hall in Nashua, N.H.

Tweet of the day



Source link

Politics

Pelosi blasts Trump’s foreign interference comments

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday bashed President Donald Trump for saying that he would be willing to accept information on a campaign opponent from a foreign government, saying she thinks Trump is “involved in a criminal cover-up,” but his remarks wouldn’t immediately push Democrats toward impeachment proceedings.

“Yesterday, the president gave us evidence once again that he doesn’t know right from wrong,” Pelosi, D-Calif., said at her weekly news conference on Capitol Hill. “It’s a very sad thing. I believe that he’s involved in a criminal cover-up. I’ve said that before, and our investigation is demonstrating that.”

Asked if Trump’s comments would be grounds to launch impeachment proceedings if he were found to accept foreign help in the upcoming election, Pelosi downplayed the idea that any one episode would force Democrats over the edge.

“What we want to have is a methodical approach to the path that we are on, and this will be included in that,” Pelosi said. “But not any one issue is going to trigger, ‘Oh now, we’re going to do this,’ because it’s about investigating, it’s about litigating, it’s about getting the truth to hold everyone accountable.”

Pelosi said Trump was inviting foreign intervention by not knowing right from wrong.

“That’s probably the nicest thing that I can say about him, because if he doesn’t know the difference, it might explain some of his ridiculous behavior,” she said. “There is no ethical sense that informs his comments and his thinking.”

Trump said in an interview excerpt that aired Wednesday that he might take help from a foreign government offering information on a political opponent. Trump made the comment to ABC’s George Stephanopoulos while discussing why his son, Donald Trump Jr., didn’t go to the FBI after he spoke with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential election.

The president told Stephanopoulos that “life doesn’t work that way” when asked why his son didn’t go to the FBI. Trump also said he would want to hear if another country had information on another candidate and called it “oppo research.”

“It’s not an interference, they have information,” Trump said. “I think I’d take it. If I thought there was something wrong, I’d go maybe to the FBI.”

When Stephanopoulos pointed out that FBI Director Christopher Wray said his agency should know about contacts from foreign governments, Trump responded, “The FBI director is wrong.

Pelosi said that while federal law prohibits contributions to a campaign that includes in-kind information from a foreign government, the law possibly “needs more clarity.”

She said that in the wake of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible obstruction of justice by Trump, Democrats will work on several pieces of legislation to require the reporting of such instances to the FBI, to protect elections with the use of paper ballots and to close foreign money loopholes.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., also blasted Trump on the Senate floor.

“To say that it’s OK for foreign countries to interfere in our elections with motives that are not in the interests of the American people — disgraceful, shocking,” Schumer said.

“This is a president who says, ‘Russia, come help.’” Schumer said. “That doesn’t prove collusion, but it sure proves that he doesn’t mind foreign powers interfering in an election.”

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., tried to avoid criticizing Trump when asked Thursday about his comments.

“This president has been tougher on Russia than any president before,” McCarthy said, adding that the Mueller report found no collusion by Trump or his campaign associates in Russia’s election meddling, and asserting that Trump “acted properly along the way.”

When asked if he would encourage the president to change his remarks, McCarthy said: “I know the president. I know the actions he took in the last campaign when he was approached by this, he did what was right. I know this president would not want any foreign government interfering in our elections. He’s strong about that.”

Asked if he would notify the FBI if he were contacted by a foreign government, McCarthy said, “I would send it to the authorities, yes.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Boris Johnson allies demand ‘vanity candidates’ pull out of leadership race – 'indulgent'

Published

on

BORIS JOHNSON supports have called on who they describe as “vanity candidates” to pull out of the race to become the next Tory leader.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Trump says he’d accept dirt on an opponent from a foreign government

Published

on

President Donald Trump said in an interview excerpt aired Wednesday that he might take help from a foreign government offering information on an opponent.

Trump made the comment to ABC’s George Stephanopoulos while discussing why his son, Donald Trump Jr., didn’t go to the FBI after he spoke with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential election.

Trump Jr. spoke to Congress for three hours Wednesday to discuss answers he gave in an interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2017, including those regarding emails leading up to the meeting that promised dirt on Hillary Clinton, Trump’s Democratic opponent.

The president told Stephanopoulos that “life doesn’t work that way” when asked why his son didn’t go to the FBI. Trump also said he would want to hear if another country had information on another candidate and called it “oppo research.”

“It’s not an interference, they have information,” Trump said. “I think I’d take it. If I thought there was something wrong, I’d go maybe to the FBI.”

Stephanopoulos then pointed out that FBI Director Christopher Wray said his agency should know about contacts from foreign governments.

“The FBI director is wrong,” Trump said.

Trump was at the center of a two-year probe into Russian election meddling and possible obstruction conducted by special counsel Robert Mueller. The 448-page report, released in April, avoided making a decision on obstruction, but Mueller did conclude that there was Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“There were multiple, systematic efforts to interfere in our election. That allegation deserves the attention of every American,” Mueller said at a press conference in May.

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday in response to Trump’s comments that the president “has either learned nothing from the last two years or picked up exactly the wrong lesson.”

“The message that he seems to be sending now is, as long as a foreign power wants to help his campaign, they can count on him having the good discretion not to alert his own FBI about it,” Schiff said. “And that’s just dangerous, appalling, unethical, unpatriotic, you name it.”

Trump claimed Thursday that his “full answer” to Stephanopoulos’ question wasn’t aired before touting recent meetings with foreign leaders.

Citing his trip to the United Kingdom for a state visit that included meetings with Queen Elizabeth II, Charles, Prince of Wales, and Camilla Parker Bowles, the Duchess of Cornwall, along with a sit-down with Prime Minister Theresa May, Trump tweeted, “Should I immediately call the FBI about these calls and meetings?”

“How ridiculous! I would never be trusted again,” he added.

Trump, in an earlier version of the tweet, referred to Prince Charles as the “prince of whales,” but deleted it minutes later.

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, called the idea of a presidential candidate accepting or encouraging foreign involvement in a campaign “simply unthinkable,” adding that when he ran for president, Senate and governor, he never experienced attempts by foreign governments to contact him or his staff.

“Let’s distinguish between circumstances where the Queen of England says something to a presidential contender — that obviously is not what we’re talking about,” Romney told reporters Thursday. “In circumstances where a foreign government attempts to be involved in an American election, that would be simply unthinkable for a candidate for president to accept that involvement, to encourage it, to participate with it in any way, shape or form. It would strike at the very heart of our democracy.”

Alex Moe contributed.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending