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By Carmen Sesin

MIAMI ­­— Born in Cuba and raised in Miami, Jorge Suárez-Múrias, 62, says he had always hoped that his parents would one day return to the properties in Cuba that were seized from them after Fidel Castro rose to power in the 1959 revolution.

“I envisioned my mom and dad would return one day and enjoy them,” Suárez-Múrias said at the family’s home in South Miami, in a backyard surrounded by mango and anón trees, much like they planted in Cuba.

Though Suárez-Múrias’ father, a former political prisoner in Cuba, passed away two years ago, he still holds out hope that his mother, Victoria, now 87 and in good health, could go back. “I hope my father is seeing me from up above, fighting. I hope his dream is fulfilled through me.”

The Múrias are taking advantage of a recent policy change by the Trump administration and exploring the possibility of seeking compensation from a company that runs one of his family’s former properties.

Known as Title III of the 1996 Helms Burton Act, the law allows the original owners of Cuban properties confiscated six decades ago to sue foreign companies “trafficking” in them for three times their current value.

The parents of Jorge Suarez-Murias outside his grandparents’ beach home in Cuba around 1946.Jorge Suarez-M?rias

In the case of the Múrias, the vast properties the family owned include apartment buildings in front of Havana’s iconic sea wall, or malecón, and an island, Cayo Ocampo, off the province of Cienfuegos. They also owned a sprawling beach neighborhood an hour from Havana where his grandfather, a developer, had built roads and villas. Suarez-Múrias says an international company is now profiting from the villas, and he’s suing them.

Far fewer claims are expected

Initially, many analysts predicted that an avalanche of lawsuits would create chaos in the U.S. court system. The State Department warned there could be up to 200,000 claims, but experts now say the number will more likely be in the dozens or hundreds at most.

Those with certified claims, around 6,000, have been eligible to file lawsuits since Title III was enacted on May 2. Those with noncertified claims, mostly Cuban-Americans who were not U.S. citizens at the time their assets were expropriated, must first send a letter to the company detailing their intent to sue. If the company doesn’t respond within 30 days, then legal action can be taken.



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Horror fight breaks out as John McDonnell branded 'terrorist' and 'liar' in winning speech

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SHADOW CHANCELLOR John McDonnell was confronted by yelling and violence as he attempted to deliver his speech after he kept his seat in Hayes and Harlington.

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Republicans trash Hunter Biden at Judiciary Committee meeting on impeachment

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Republicans dragged Hunter Biden’s name through the mud Thursday at the House Judiciary Committee meeting on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., recounted Biden’s admitted past drug abuse — which quickly backfired when Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., hinted at the Florida lawmaker’s own past substance abuse problems.

During the committee meeting, Gaetz introduced an amendment to strike a reference of former Vice President Joe Biden from the articles of impeachment and put in Burisma, a Ukrainian energy company, and Hunter Biden, who sat on the board of that company.

Gaetz then read aloud from an extensive profile of Hunter Biden in The New Yorker, which detailed Biden’s past drug abuse and an incident in which he crashed a rental car and an official from the company found “a crack pipe in the car and, on one of the consoles, a line of white-powder residue.”

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Hunter Biden speaks on stage at the World Food Program USA’s Annual McGovern-Dole Leadership Award Ceremony at Organization of American States on April 12, 2016 in Washington.Teresa Kroeger / Getty Images file

“I don’t want to make light of anyone’s substance abuse issues … but it’s a little hard to believe that Burisma hired Hunter Biden to resolve their international disputes when he could not resolve his own dispute with Hertz rental car over leaving cocaine and a crack pipe in the car,” Gaetz said.

Johnson, D-Ga., shot back and hinted at Gaetz’s 2008 arrest on charges of driving under the influence.

“The pot calling the kettle black is not something we should do,” Johnson said. “I don’t know what members have had problems with substance abuse, been busted for DUI — I don’t know. But if I did, I wouldn’t raise it against anyone.”

The charges against Gaetz were later dropped, according to PolitiFact.

Other Republicans on the committee also went after Hunter Biden by questioning if he had the experience to work at Burisma and claiming his political connections got him the job.

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, alleged Hunter Biden got a “sweetheart deal” working at Burisma, while Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, claimed that Democrats were trying to sweep his conflicts “under the rug.”

“And nearly every single witness who testified at the Intelligence Committee impeachment inquiry agreed that Hunter Biden’s Burisma deal created at the very least the appearance of a conflict of interest,” Chabot said. “Yet, the Democrats on the Intelligence Committee and Chairman (Adam) Schiff and Democrats in this committee are determined to sweep all this under the rug, ignore it, not let us call witnesses on it and instead rush to impeach this president.”

A representative for Hunter Biden did not immediately return a request for comment.

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Election shock of the night! Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson LOSES SEAT to SNP

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JO SWINSON has been unseated from her seat in Dunbartonshire East by just 149 votes.

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