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An amputee is seeking answers as to why a picture showing the remainder of his leg is being featured on cigarette packets to deter people from smoking.

The 60-year-old man, who lives in the northeastern French city of Metz, was made aware of the image by his son after he bought some rolling tobacco in Luxembourg.

It was displayed alongside the message “smoking clogs your arteries”, even though the man says he lost his leg in a shooting in his native Albania back in 1997.

French media reports that the man lost his leg in a shooting in 1997
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French media reports that the man lost his leg in a shooting in 1997

His son recognised the distinctive scars and brought a packet of the tobacco back to France, and a lawyer for the man is now working to get to the bottom of why it was allowed to happen without his consent.

Antoine Fittante told radio station France Bleu: “It’s incredible that a person ends up, without his agreement, on packs of cigarettes from the European Union.”

He added: “His amputation has absolutely nothing to do with a problem related to tobacco.

“My client feels betrayed. We must recognise that it is not very pleasant.”

Six weeks before the cigarette packet was discovered, the man had visited a local hospital in the hope that he might be able to be provided with equipment to help him walk.

Mr Fittante said he has since written to the hospital to find out how the photo ended up being used, and he has also contacted the European Commission.

The executive branch of the EU is responsible for the distribution of such images on cigarette packets, and Mr Fittante said they are normally sourced from a verified database.

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Hong Kong police fire tear gas in new protests over surveillance fears | World News

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Police in Hong Kong have used tear gas for the first time in about 10 days to try to break up fresh anti-government protests.

The latest demonstrations took place in the Kwun Tong industrial district of the Chinese-ruled city on Saturday.

Protesters took to the streets to demand the removal of smart lampposts over fears they could contain high-tech cameras and facial recognition software used for surveillance by Chinese authorities.

Police fire tear gas
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Police fire tear gas against activists in the Kwun Tong district of Hong Kong
Hong Kong protests
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Some activists carried umbrellas, which have become a symbol of passive resistance against the authorities

Activists, carrying umbrellas in the sweltering heat, filled a main road in the Kowloon peninsula, calling for the government to answer their demands.

Some protesters set up makeshift barricades on a road outside a police station, as they faced off with police in riot gear.

“Hong Kong people’s private information is already being extradited to China. We have to be very concerned,” said march organiser Ventus Lau.

Umbrellas have become a symbol of passive resistance against the authorities.

The Umbrella Movement is a political group which emerged during the Hong Kong democracy protests of 2014.

The latest wave of demonstrations began almost three months ago over a now-suspended bill which would allow criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China.

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The protests are also fuelled by concerns about the erosion of freedoms guaranteed under the “one country, two systems” formula that was put in place after the territory returned from UK to Chinese rule in 1997.

Simon Cheng Man-Kit reportedly failed to return to Hong Hong from Shenzhen in China 10 days ago
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Simon Cheng Man-Kit has been released after 15 days in detention

Meanwhile, a British consulate employee has been released after 15 days of detention in mainland China.

Police in Shenzhen said Simon Cheng Man-kit was released as scheduled on Saturday, having been detained for violating public security management regulations.

The Global Times, a Communist Party-owned newspaper, said he had been detained for “soliciting prostitutes”.

China often uses such charges against political targets.

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Hong Kong: Police fire tear gas to try to disperse new anti-government protests | World News

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Police in Hong Kong have used tear gas for the first time in about 10 days to try to break up fresh anti-government protests.

The latest demonstrations took place in the Kwun Tong industrial district of the Chinese-ruled city.

Protesters took to the streets to demand the removal of smart lampposts over fears they could contain high-tech cameras and facial recognition software used for surveillance by Chinese authorities.

Activists, carrying umbrellas in the sweltering heat, filled a main road in the Kowloon peninsula, calling for the government to answer their demands.

Some protesters set up makeshift barricades on a road outside a police station, facing off with police in riot gear.

“Hong Kong people’s private information is already being extradited to China. We have to be very concerned,” said march organiser Ventus Lau.

Umbrellas have become a symbol of passive resistance against the authorities.

The Umbrella Movement is a political group which emerged during the Hong Kong democracy protests of 2014.

The latest wave of demonstrations began almost three months ago over a now-suspended bill which would allow criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China.

The protests are also fuelled by concerns about the erosion of freedoms guaranteed under the “one country, two systems” formula that was put in place after the territory returned to Chinese rule in 1997.

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Vaping-related death in the US amid ‘alarming’ rise in serious illnesses | US News

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A person who contracted a serious lung disease after using a vaping device has died in Illinois.

It is being treated as the first death in the US that has been linked to the smoking alternative, which is especially popular with teenagers and young adults.

Illinois Department of Public Health said the patient, who was between 17 and 38 years old, had been taken to hospital when they fell ill after vaping.

Their name, hometown and the date they died have not been disclosed.

Earlier this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 149 people nationwide had contracted a severe respiratory illness after vaping, but no deaths have been reported.

In Illinois, the number of people who have contracted a respiratory illness after vaping has doubled in the past week to 22.

Dr Ngozi Ezike, from the Illinois Department of Public Health, said: “We requested a team from the CDC to help us investigate these cases and they arrived in Illinois on Tuesday.

“The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous.”

All of the illnesses reported were in teens or adults who had used an electronic cigarette or some other kind of vaping device.

Doctors say the illnesses resemble an inhalation injury, with the lungs apparently reacting to a caustic substance.

Health officials around the country have been reporting patients getting sick after vaping, including two in Connecticut, four in Iowa and six in Ohio.

They are asking doctors and hospitals to tell state health officials about any possible vaping-related lung disease cases they encounter.

In the UK, Public Health England says on its website: “While not without some risk, when compared to smoking e-cigarettes are far less harmful [than smoking cigarettes].

“E-cigarette vapour does not contain tar or carbon monoxide, two of the most harmful elements in tobacco smoke. It does contain some chemicals also found in tobacco smoke, but at much lower levels.”

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