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At least two 9/11 mourners reading the names of the victims at the annual memorial ceremony flipped the solemn moment into a dramatic political stage in New York on Wednesday. One decried gun violence and another mocked Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar.

Nicholas Haros Jr. of New Jersey, who lost his mother, Francis Haros, in the World Trade Center attack, took the stage wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with “Some people did something” — a favorite four-word attack Republicans have used against Omar, a freshman Democratic lawmaker.

Conservatives have said Omar, who is Muslim American, was trivializing the 9/11 attacks in using those words earlier this year.

“Today I am here to respond to you, exactly who did what to whom,” Haros said to a smattering of applause. “We know who and what was done, there’s no uncertainty about that.”

Haros also looped in three other Democratic members of Congress known as “the squad” — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley, all women of color — into his attack.

“Our constitutional freedoms were attacked and our nation’s founding on Judeo-Christian principles were attacked,” Haros said. “That’s what some people did — got that now? We are here today, Congresswoman, to tell you and ‘the squad’ just who did what to whom.”

Omar, speaking at a Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) event in March, said the reaction to the Sept. 11 attacks had unfairly tarnished millions of Muslims in America.

“Here’s the truth. For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties,” Omar said.

“So you can’t just say that today someone is looking at me strange and that I am trying to make myself look pleasant. You have to say that this person is looking at me strange, I am not comfortable with it, and I am going to talk to them and ask them why. Because that is the right you have.”

A representative for Omar on Wednesday declined to comment Haros’ statement.

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But earlier in the day Omar tweeted: “September 11th was an attack on all of us. We will never forget the thousands of Americans who lost their lives in the largest terror attack on U.S. soil.”

Earlier in the ceremony on Wednesday, Debra Epps, the sister of victim Christopher Samuel Epps, said of her brother: “Our family always thinks about you, we recall you in every aspect of our lives. You are deeply missed.”

Then Epps used her time to lament the slow pace of gun control legislation since the atacks.

“In 18 years, you would think we would have made changes to bring us to more peace. However gun violence is on the rampant,” she said. “And I hope today that legislation continues to move forward in banning guns … so that we can live in a world at peace and the home of the brave.”

Annie Cruickshank contributed.



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Labour poll: Should Jeremy Corbyn admit how he obtained ‘nonsense’ leaked documents – VOTE

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JEREMY CORBYN attempted to turn the tables by presenting a report which claims Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal would lead to customs checks between the UK and Northern Ireland – a claim the Prime Minister has rubbished as “complete nonsense”. But should the Labour leader admit how he obtained the secret document?

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Corbyn bombshell: Labour leader campaign group has shock links to Soviet supporters

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JEREMY CORBYN’S quest to win next week’s general election and oust Boris Johnson as Prime Minister is being backed by a campaign group that has shock links to the Soviet past, it has been claimed.

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Democrats’ impeachment report cites Trump obstruction and withholding aid, warns of ‘grave harm’

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WASHINGTON — The Democratic-led House Intelligence Committee released a report Tuesday containing a summary of the evidence it has collected in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

The 300-page report cited two instances of misconduct by the president: obstruction of the House inquiry and withholding an official White House meeting and U.S. military aid from Ukraine on the condition of investigating a Trump political rival.

“This report chronicles a scheme of the President of the United States to coerce an ally, Ukraine, that is at war with an adversary, Russia, into doing the president’s political dirty work,” said Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., at a press conference outlining his committee’s findings.

The House Intelligence Committee voted 13-9 in a closed-door meeting on Tuesday evening to send the report to the Judiciary, which will start proceedings on Wednesday.

While the report, which was also prepared by the House Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees, didn’t explicitly include recommendations of articles of impeachment, it strongly implies that obstruction could be one. The report noted that past presidents who were the subject of impeachment inquiries, unlike Trump, complied with subpoenas and requests for information from Congress.

On obstruction, which was described as a “campaign of intimidation,” the report cast Trump’s efforts to “flout” congressional oversight as unprecedented because of his refusal to hand over documents and make certain witnesses available. But it also noted that “the House gathered overwhelming evidence of his misconduct from courageous individuals who were willing to follow the law.”

“No other President has flouted the Constitution and power of Congress to conduct oversight to this extent,” the report said.

“If left unanswered, President Trump’s ongoing effort to thwart Congress’ impeachment power risks doing grave harm to the institution of Congress, the balance of power between our branches of government, and the Constitutional order that the President and every Member of Congress have sworn to protect and defend.”

The report also constructed a detailed timeline of Trump’s alleged efforts to withhold military assistance to Ukraine, as well as an official invitation to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to meet with Trump in the White House. The timeline was based on the testimony of various aides and diplomats who have been questioned by impeachment investigators.

Ukraine “desperately wanted and needed” U.S. security assistance as well as a White House meeting between its president, Zelenskiy, and Trump, Schiff said.

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“At the same time, there was something President Trump desperately wanted and believed that he needed — and that was an investigation that would damage the rival that he feared the most, Joe Biden, as well as an investigation into a debunked conspiracy theory that it was Ukraine, not Russia, that interfered in our last election,” he said.

The report included a number of new details that stemmed from AT&T phone records obtained by the House, which showed someone who was using a phone number associated with the Office of Management and Budget called the president’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, in early August during the period when the U.S. aid to Ukraine was frozen. That same day, call records show Giuliani also called the White House Situation Room five times as well as the OMB number.

To freeze the security assistance — which was announced to Trump administration officials on July 18, and not reversed until Sept. 11 — Trump inquired about the aid starting in mid-June and around July 12 “directed that a hold be placed” on the aid to Ukraine, the report said.

“In making the decision to move forward, we were struck by the fact that the President’s misconduct was not an isolated occurrence, nor was it the product of a naïve president,” the report said.

“President Trump does not appear to believe there is any such limitation on his power to use White House meetings, military aid or other official acts to procure foreign help in his re-election.”

The president’s conduct, which put “his own personal and political interests above the interests of the American people,” Schiff said, is “exactly why they prescribed a remedy as extraordinary as the remedy of impeachment.”

“We have a very difficult decision ahead of us to make,” said Schiff, who explained that it will be a decision made by the House Judiciary Committee in conjunction with the House Democratic Caucus.

The report puts the White House summary of Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukraine’s president at the center of the inquiry, calling it “stark evidence of misconduct” and “a demonstration of the President’s prioritization of his personal political benefit over the national interest.”

But, the report claimed, this conversation was “neither the start nor the end of President Trump’s efforts to bend U.S. foreign policy for his personal gain.”

“Rather, it was a dramatic crescendo within a months-long campaign driven by President Trump in which senior U.S. officials, including the Vice President, the Secretary of State, the Acting Chief of Staff, the Secretary of Energy, and others were either knowledgeable of or active participants in an effort to extract from a foreign nation the personal political benefits sought by the President,” the report said.

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During his Tuesday remarks, Schiff said Americans should care deeply about whether the president is “betraying their trust in him” and betraying the oath he took to the Constitution.

“If we don’t care about this, we can darn well be sure the president will be back at it doing this all over again,” he said.

The release came ahead of a Tuesday evening meeting scheduled for the panel to consider and vote on adopting the report. The report, along with views provided by Republicans, will then be sent to the House Judiciary Committee, which is taking over the next phase of the inquiry.

Much of the evidence came from 17 closed-door interviews with key witnesses, and over two weeks of public hearings last month with a dozen of those witnesses.

In their public testimony, a number of those 12 witnesses confirmed and elaborated on the efforts allegedly made by Trump, his associates and administration officials to get Ukraine to announce investigations into those two issues, and why they believed delayed U.S. aid to Ukraine would only be released once that nation followed through on those demands.

Republicans on the House Intelligence, Oversight, and Foreign Affairs committees released a 123-page minority report Monday evening that argues that Democrats have failed to establish any impeachable offenses by Trump. They said that they didn’t find that Trump engaged in any wrongdoing, and that there was no quid pro quo.

Republicans said there was no evidence that Trump improperly withheld $391 million in military aid to Ukraine or pressured Zelenskiy to investigate Joe Biden to help benefit his 2020 re-election campaign, arguing that much of Trump’s action regarding Ukraine actually stems from his “longstanding” skepticism of the country due to “its history of pervasive corruption.”

On Wednesday, the House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hold its first impeachment hearing, which its chairman, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said will “explore the framework put in place to respond to serious allegations of impeachable misconduct like those against President Trump.”

Nadler extended an invitation to Trump and his counsel to participate in Wednesday’s hearing, but the White House said Sunday that they had declined the offer. The president is in London this week for the 2019 NATO summit.

It has not yet been decided how many hearings Judiciary might hold or what charges potentially might be wrapped into articles of impeachment. Some lawmakers have recently raised the possibility that other cases could be considered, such as those stemming from former special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

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