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WASHINGTON — In July, Rudy Giuliani was desperate for more information about Hunter Biden’s work in Ukraine.

So he turned to his longtime fixer for Ukrainian deals, a 44-year-old New York-based businessman named Vitaly Pruss.

According to Pruss, Giuliani asked him to call Pruss’ close friend, the owner of Burisma, the Ukrainian natural gas company that formerly had Hunter Biden on its board. Giuliani wanted to know if the owner, Mykola Zlochevsky, would meet with him to talk about Biden.

But Zlochevsky made it clear “he wanted nothing to do with it,” Pruss told NBC News in an interview at a restaurant in midtown Manhattan.

Among the unresolved mysteries in the impeachment saga is how Giuliani, the president’s lawyer and a man with little known background in foreign policy, became the White House’s point man on Ukraine. The answer in part lies with his relationship with Pruss, who has acted as the former New York mayor’s political and business matchmaker in the former Soviet Union for years.

Few people have crossed paths with as many central characters in the Ukraine impeachment saga as Pruss.

He met Energy Secretary Rick Perry on a trip to Israel in 2010. On flights back and forth to Kyiv, he struck up an acquaintance with America’s top diplomat in Ukraine, Bill Taylor. At investment conferences, he has met the former U.S. ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, who was ousted from her post in Kyiv in May, partly through Giuliani’s efforts. And Pruss knows most of the Ukrainian political players.

The website for Pruss’ company, TriGlobal Strategic Ventures, is a veritable slideshow of Giuliani’s connections in Ukraine in recent years, with pictures of him smiling with local officials. And almost all of the relationships laid out in the website’s photos are links that House Democrats now want to know more about.

The Democratic lawmakers are demanding to see all of Giuliani’s communications, contracts and documents related to Pruss, as part of their impeachment inquiry. Giuliani has refused to cooperate with the congressional investigation.

His lawyer said Giuliani believes the congressional subpoena is “overbroad, unduly burdensome, and seeks documents beyond the scope of legitimate inquiry.”

Shortly after Democrats subpoenaed Giuliani, Pruss’ company took down its website without explanation. Pruss said the timing was a coincidence and was merely for website “maintenance.” It’s now back up.

Pruss played down his Forrest Gump-like role in the impeachment drama and said he is befuddled that his name cropped up in impeachment subpoenas. He said that despite his relationship with Giuliani, he had nothing to do with the events that form the basis of the impeachment inquiry into whether President Donald Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine for his own personal political gain.

“I have no idea why in the world I’m in there.”

Giuliani is now under investigation by federal prosecutors in New York, and Pruss could have crucial insights about how the former mayor carries out his lobbying for foreign clients.

Vitaly Pruss, Rudy Giuliani’s fixer in the former Soviet Union, in an undated picture.via Facebook

A relationship dating back to 2003

Born in Belarus, Pruss registered his business to a Passaic, New Jersey, address in 2005, according to public records. He first focused on the “introduction business” where he matched high-level Western officials with companies willing to pay them for appearing at public and private events. He’s a U.S. citizen and New York resident but travels constantly. In the last 30 days alone, he’s been in Israel, Vienna, Kyiv and Kazakhstan.

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He said the bulk of his work today is in drumming up investments in American nursing homes from Ukraine, Russia and Kazakhstan.

Pruss’ bio claims he has “successfully created and developed strategies” for companies like the Russian state oil and gas pipeline monopoly, TransNeft, which was sanctioned by the U.S. government in 2014 after the Russian invasion of Crimea. When asked about his dealings with TransNeft, he said he only presented the company with a proposal and it was long before sanctions were imposed.

Pruss said his relationship with Giuliani started back in 2003 when he was looking for a big Western name to address the board of Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works, one of the largest steel companies in Russia.

At the time Giuliani, who became internationally famous after the 9/11 attack on New York, was commanding $100,000 per speech through the Washington Speaker’s Bureau. His speeches earned him an estimated $8 million a year, according to his divorce filings at the time.

Pruss said he made a request through the speaker’s bureau and negotiated a payment for the appearance. Then he said he went with Giuliani on the trip, flying with him first to Moscow and then on to the Ural Mountains for the meeting.

He said at that point he and the former mayor hit it off, and through the years he has found Giuliani to be widely “loved and respected.”

On his website, there are photos in May 2008 and April 2015 showing Giuliani with Vitaly Klitschko, the ex-boxer who is now mayor of Kyiv, on his visits to New York City. Pruss said he made that connection. House lawmakers leading the impeachment inquiry have raised questions about “offers or anything of value” that Giuliani provided to Klitschko.

Representatives of Giuliani’s security company visited the State Emergency Service of Ukraine in 2017, according to the agency’s website. A year later, there’s a picture of Giuliani on Pruss’ website in a New York conference room with an official from Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city. Pruss said he made it all happen.

And when Giuliani met with Ukraine’s then-President Petro Poroshenko in late 2017, there’s Pruss sitting at the end of the table, in a picture first published by Poroshenko’s office.

But he said reports that he arranged for Giuliani to speak at an annual Kremlin-backed security conference in Armenia in October that also featured Russian President Vladimir Putin are inaccurate and concerns about it overblown.

Giuliani spoke at the event in 2018 but this year he pulled out at the last minute once a White House whistleblower came forward accusing Giuliani of carrying out a shadow foreign policy in Ukraine to help Trump’s re-election.

Pruss said yes, he attended the conference and was planning to meet Giuliani there, but he did not arrange the appearance.

“There was nothing wrong about the Armenian conference. They do it all the time. It is about security cooperation and investments. Nothing about Russia or U.S. or Ukraine,” he said in a text exchange.

In June, Pruss said he met Giuliani in a hotel lobby in Paris. Giuliani was with two Florida businessmen: Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, two Giuliani associates who have since been charged with campaign finance violations linked to an alleged effort to inject foreign money into a U.S. election. The two have also been linked to a smear campaign against the then-U.S. ambassador, Yovanovitch.

Rudy Giuliani at a meeting with former Ukraine President Poroshenko, and Vitaly Pruss sitting at the end of the table to Giuliani’s far right, on Nov. 22, 2017.Archived picture from Ukranian Presidential page

Pruss said before that meeting he had not heard of the two men. “I haven’t run into them during my work at all,” he said. And he said he doesn’t know who was funding them: “No idea. Tell me if you find out. I’m interested to know.”

But he said he is sure it wasn’t Russia. “Kremlin doesn’t work with people like them. It is too low for Kremlin.”

Pruss said he finds the impeachment drama “disgusting,” and does not believe Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy was coerced. He said in addition to Zelenskiy’s public statements that he was not pressured to investigate Hunter Biden, he has heard from those in Zelenskiy’s inner circle who add to the chorus of “no pressure.” But he said Trump’s offer to Zelenskiy to have Attorney General William Barr help the Ukrainian government look into Hunter Biden was “beneath him.”

Instead, Trump “should have had someone else do it,” he said.

‘The case is closed’

As the Gump of the Trump-Ukraine saga, Pruss has also crossed paths with Team Trump’s main target — Hunter Biden.

Pruss’ LinkedIn page has an entry from eight years ago showing a joint venture with Rosemont Realty, which was partially managed by Devon Archer, Hunter Biden’s close friend. Pruss said that’s when he encountered the younger Biden, but he said he did not introduce Biden to Burisma.

Unlike Giuliani, Pruss said he is reluctant to call for any investigation into Burisma, his friend Zlochevsky’s natural gas company.

“They have been investigated. The case is closed. I don’t know details. Important thing, they are largest independent gas company in Ukraine. Very essential for conflict with Russia. They have to be supported not attacked,” he said.

As for Hunter Biden, he said there’s no crime to investigate. “Whatever he did in Ukraine was highly unethical,” he said, “There was no crime but very bad judgment.”

Despite probing by Trump associates, there is no evidence that Hunter Biden or his father, the former vice president and current presidential candidate, acted improperly or violated any laws.

Meanwhile, in politically charged congressional hearings in Washington, Giuliani’s activities in Ukraine have come under intense scrutiny, with Democrats accusing Trump’s personal lawyer of pressuring Ukraine to dig up dirt on the Bidens.

But Pruss, who watched part of the hearings on television, said he doesn’t have anything to do with what transpired between Trump, Giuliani and Zelenskiy.

“I’m totally irrelevant to this story.”

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Warren goes after Buttigieg, Bloomberg in change of tactics

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who rarely criticizes her opponents by name, went on the offensive Thursday night, directly challenging Pete Buttigieg and Michael Bloomberg, two of her rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination.

After her speech at the Democratic National Committee’s I Will Vote event in Boston, Warren called on Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, to let the news media into his private campaign events “so that anyone can come in and report on what’s being said” to big financial donors.

Warren had been asked about a New York Times editorial examining Buttigieg’s career at the management consulting firm McKinsey & Company, but she chose to talk, instead, about his private fundraising events, referring to him as “Mayor Pete.”

“I think that voters want to know about possible conflicts of interests,” she said. “It is even more important that the candidates expose possible conflicts of interests right now, and that means, for example, that the mayor should be releasing who is on his finance committee, who are the bundlers who are raising big money for him.”

She added: “No one should be left to wonder what kind of promises are being made to the people who can pony up big bucks to be in the room.”

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In response, Buttigieg’s top spokeswoman, Lis Smith, tweeted: “If @ewarren wants to have a debate about transparency, she can start by opening up the doors to the decades of tax returns she’s hiding from her work as a corporate lawyer — often defending the types of corporate bad actors she now denounces.”

Warren also used the withdrawal from the race of Sen. Kamala Harris of California to go after Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York, who entered the race last month.

Noting that neither Harris nor Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, who failed to qualify, would be part of the next Democratic debate, Warren said: “There will not be a single person of color on that stage, and as I said, women have been forced out of this race at a time when billionaires can buy their way in.

“Michael Bloomberg just did a $37 million ad buy in one week in order to make himself a candidate while he skips the usual parts of democracy, like shaking hands with people and hearing directly about their concerns,” she said.

“If democracy is just going to be about billionaires buying their way in, then buckle up, because we’re going to have an America that just works better and better for billionaires and leaves everyone else behind,” she said.

Warren signaled the new tactic on Wednesday night, when she appeared on Bloomberg TV, which is owned by Bloomberg, and said: “What is broken in America is we’ve got a country that is working great for those at the top … and that is why I’m so concerned about Michael Bloomberg jumping into this race, dropping $37 million in one week on ad buys. I don’t think elections ought to be for sale.”

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Warren was at or near the top of Democratic polls earlier in the autumn, but in recent weeks she has started to fall behind former Vice President Joe Biden.

The most recent national poll by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, released last week, put Warren at 14 percent, trailing Biden, at 27.8 percent. The same poll in the first week of October had Warren leading Biden by 30 percent to 27 percent.

Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, with whom she is roughly even in recent polls, have declined to raise money at private events. Biden, unlike Buttigieg, has allowed reporters at all of his fundraising events.

Deepa Shivaram contributed.



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John Kerry endorses Joe Biden for president

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WASHINGTON — John Kerry, the former senator from Massachusetts, secretary of state and Democratic presidential nominee in 2004, threw his support behind former Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential bid on Thursday.

Kerry praised Biden in a statement released by the Biden campaign, saying that “there’s never been a time more urgent for leadership at home.”

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“I believe Joe Biden is the president our country desperately needs right now, not because I’ve known Joe so long, but because I know Joe so well,” Kerry said. “I’ve never before seen the world more in need of someone who on Day One can begin the incredibly hard work of putting back together the world Donald Trump has smashed apart.”

“Joe is uniquely the person running for president who can beat Donald Trump and get to work on Day One at home and in the world with no time to waste.”

Kerry will campaign with Biden on Friday in Iowa and in New Hampshire on Sunday.

The endorsement comes as Biden has amplified his qualifications to be commander-in-chief, given his foreign policy experience. On Wednesday, his campaign released a video saying that “the world is laughing at President Trump.”

Kerry has a long history with Biden — they served together in the Obama administration and in the Senate, where both were on the Foreign Relations Committee. When Biden left the Senate to become vice president, Kerry succeeded him as the chairman of the committee.

With his deep relationships on Capitol Hill, Biden is outpacing his Democratic peers in endorsements from sitting lawmakers, too. He’s backed by 22 House representatives, five senators and three governors — more of each category, and more endorsements in total, than any other candidate in the race.



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Pete Buttigieg talks 2020 election, diversity in Democratic party

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In an exclusive interview, 2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg sat down with NBC News’ Vaughn Hillyard to discuss varying issues including diversity in the Democratic party, his appeal to voters and how he compares to former Vice President Joe Biden.

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